Dignitas Article

An Update on the Frontlines of Alternatives to Embryonic Stem Cell Research

Special Resource Types: 

The Discovery of Global Bioethics through an Application of C.S. Lewis' Thought on the Moral Law

Special Resource Types: 

Regulation (or Lack Thereof) of Assisted Reproductive Technologies in the U.S. and Abroad

Special Resource Types: 

Medical Exploitation and Black Market Organs: Profiteering and Disparities in Global Medicine

Special Resource Types: 

HPV Vaccine: Panacea or Pandora’s Box? The Costs and Deceptiveness of the New Technology

Special Resource Types: 

G12 Country Regulations of Assisted Reproductive Technologies

Special Resource Types: 

From iPods to iHumans: What Will Nanotechnology Do to Us?

Special Resource Types: 

When I Was Hungry, You Gave Me to Eat: The Dignity of Hand Feeding in Persons with Dementia

Preserving the dignity of those who inhabit Nursing Homes at the end of life—individuals frequently bearing the concurrent burden of dementia— is a critical feature of cultures that embrace compassion. In the United States, such persons comprise a demographic estimated at five million. One demanding aspect of care in this population is feeding. The ethical dilemma resides in the choice between hand feeding by staff or family versus feeding tubes. Hand feeding is adopted when it is comfortable and safe, that is, unaccompanied by aspiration; and although human intimacy integral to hand feeding would be preferable, feeding tubes have become de rigueur in contemporary medical practice. As Kenneth Ludmerer poignantly asked, might the efficiency in time and effort derived from feeding tubes, as well as their reimbursement as medical procedures, be the dynamic driving choice in this context?[1] Recent publications are noteworthy in this regard.

Podcast Episode: 
145

Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome: An Update on Contemporary Reproductive Technology and Ethics

Special Resource Types: 

Egg Cryopreservation: An Update on an Emerging Reproductive Technology

Egg cryopreservation or freezing is a technique that was first demonstrated to be a success in the mid-1980s with the first report of a live birth from frozen and thawed human eggs. This technique, however, was abandoned as a routine clinical option after initial concerns that egg cryopreservation led to an increase in chromosomal abnormalities[1] and as the transfer of cryopreserved embryos became more commonplace. Interest in this technique has been recently renewed as a means of preserving the eggs of women about to undergo chemotherapy and for patients who object to embryo cryopreservation on religious or moral grounds. In particular, this procedure is being investigated as an alternative to embryo cryopreservation by countries that do not permit the freezing of embryos, such as Italy and Germany, in addition to fertility centers in the U.S., which recognize both a need and the financial incentive for offering this technique. It has been calculated that 936 children worldwide have been born from cryopreserved eggs as of April 2009.[2]

Podcast Episode: 
133

Pages