On Human Bioenhancements

 

Podcast Episode: 
148

The Slippery Slope of Normality: Lessons from Neuroethics (Part 2)

 

Part 1

This lecture was originally delivered as a combined institute session during our 2009 preconference institutes. In this part of the lecture Dr. Cheshire explores the nature of slippery slope arguments, the meaning of normality, developments in cognitive enhancement, and arguments in favor of neuroenhancement.

Podcast Episode: 
147

The Slippery Slope of Normality: Lessons from Neuroethics (Part 1)

 

Part 2

This lecture was originally delivered as a combined institute session during our 2009 preconference institutes. In this part of the lecture Dr. Cheshire explores the nature of slippery slope arguments, the meaning of normality, developments in cognitive enhancement, and arguments in favor of neuroenhancement.

Podcast Episode: 
146

When I Was Hungry, You Gave Me to Eat: The Dignity of Hand Feeding in Persons with Dementia

Preserving the dignity of those who inhabit Nursing Homes at the end of life—individuals frequently bearing the concurrent burden of dementia— is a critical feature of cultures that embrace compassion. In the United States, such persons comprise a demographic estimated at five million. One demanding aspect of care in this population is feeding. The ethical dilemma resides in the choice between hand feeding by staff or family versus feeding tubes. Hand feeding is adopted when it is comfortable and safe, that is, unaccompanied by aspiration; and although human intimacy integral to hand feeding would be preferable, feeding tubes have become de rigueur in contemporary medical practice. As Kenneth Ludmerer poignantly asked, might the efficiency in time and effort derived from feeding tubes, as well as their reimbursement as medical procedures, be the dynamic driving choice in this context?[1] Recent publications are noteworthy in this regard.

Podcast Episode: 
145

Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome: An Update on Contemporary Reproductive Technology and Ethics

Grey Matters: Just Enhancement

As the United States considers how best to restrain the growth of healthcare costs while ensuring quality and access, the potential economic impact of proposals for enhancement medicine should not be overlooked. This essay makes the case that the practice of neuroenhancement, if it were to become widespread, would infringe upon the ethical principle of distributive justice.

Podcast Episode: 
144

Life on Ice: The Landscape of Embryo Donation and Adoption (Part 1)

 

Part 2
Part 3

This lecture was delivered as a combined session for the preconference institutes prior to the 2009 CBHD summer conference, Global Bioethics: Emerging Challenges Facing Human Dignity.

Podcast Episode: 
141

To Dialyze or Not to Dialyze

 
 
Podcast Episode: 
140

Sanctifying Life in the Early Church

Issues: 

Evidence from both Christian and pagan sources reveals that the pre-Constantinian Christian churches practiced a broad and holistic sanctity-of-life ethic. A review of the documents can only deepen our confidence that a sanctity-of-life ethic is neither a modern nor merely a political innovation but instead goes back to the very origins of our tradition. But the very comprehensive nature of that ethic challenges our truncated contemporary versions, in which conservatives tend to pick out birth and end-of-life concerns and liberals focus on issues like hunger, war, and racism.

Podcast Episode: 
139

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