End of Life

Una buena muerte

Issues: 

Los dilemas éticos que se presentan al final de la vida son cada vez más frecuentes y complejos. Al menos dos factores contribuyen a esto: primero, los avances impresionantes de la medicina durante las tres últimas décadas han reducido significativamente la incidencia de la muerte súbita en países desarrollados. Tenemos ahora un sistema 911 nacional listo para llamar a ambulancias de apoyo vital avanzado con equipos médicos de emergencia con una excelente capacitación y desfibriladores portátiles. Transportan a las personas críticamente enfermas a hospitales donde hay equipos esperando para hacer angioplastias de emergencia y que cuentan con centros de emergencia y unidades de cuidado intensivo para preservar la vida de los que están críticamente enfermos. Como resultado, muchos que antes hubieran muerto repentinamente ahora están muriendo gradualmente de otras enfermedades; muchos a una edad avanzada.[1] La muerte súbita, después de todo, evita muchas ambigüedades éticas. La muerte gradual plantea muchos más desafíos éticos.

Podcast Episode: 
58

Joy Riley Interviews Calum MacKellar

Dr. D. Joy Riley, Executive Director of the Tennessee Center for Bioethics and Culture, interviews Dr. Calum MacKellar, Director of Research for the Scottish Council on Human Bioethics, Edinburgh, Scotland.

Podcast Episode: 
50

Donor after Cardiac Death: What Is the Christian’s Response?

The notion of organ donation after cardiac death (DCD) came into prominent public view in 1993, with the national awareness of the Pittsburgh Protocol.[1] More recently, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, through the Organ Transplantation Breakthrough Collaborative, strongly encouraged increased recognition and use of DCD in an attempt to increase the number of organs available for transplantation. Even more recently, the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) has stipulated that hospitals must have a DCD policy in place as of January 2007 in order to maintain accreditation. Consequentially, whereas some years ago, we might have sagely nodded our heads thinking, “this too will pass,” it is now quite apparent that the issue will not.

Podcast Episode: 
38

End of Life Decisions 101

The care of patients near the end of life can be ethically challenging. Physicians and other health care professionals may find certain concepts vague and hard to understand. Furthermore, there must be a balance between two extremes: a treat-at-all-costs vitalism on the one hand, and a too-rapid withdrawal of potentially beneficial treatments on the other. The purpose of this article is to provide some conceptual clarity.

Podcast Episode: 
32

End of Life Legislation (or New York's Lack Thereof)

If I were to suffer from a health care crisis from which I was unable to speak for myself, who should have the right to speak for me? Common parlance suggests that the closest members of my family (spouse and adult children, in my case) should be able to speak on my behalf. This will indeed be the case for me, because I have an advance directive appointing my wife and adult children as my health care agents. For the 4 out of 5 New Yorkers who do not have an advance directive, there is no guarantee who would have the authority to speak on their behalf.

Podcast Episode: 
16

Life's Worth: The Case against Assisted Suicide (Podcast)

Issues: 

"Favoring physician-assisted suicide (hereafter PAS) is intuitive, self-evident; it is a matter of compassion." That is what one of my students recently claimed, and his view is shared by others. "After all," he went on to argue, "what else would any humane person do but assist those who are suffering and terminally ill to die if they wish such assistance?"

Podcast Episode: 
14

Fighting for David

Issues: 

An interview with publicist Adrianna Wright.

Podcast Episode: 
12

Terri Schiavo - The First Anniversary

Issues: 

On March 31st 2005 a brain-damaged woman in a Florida hospice died some days after her tube-delivered food and fluid were withdrawn by court order (1). The case of Terri Schiavo may yet prove to be to end-of-life decision making what Roe v. Wade was to the abortion debate. Or it may not. A year on, with the “pro” view held out in a book just published by husband Michael Schiavo and the “anti” view argued in a book by Terri’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Schindler, where are we?

Podcast Episode: 
9

Pages