Human Enhancement

Can Technology Change Human Nature?

Groups like the World Transhumanist Association hope that we will soon be able to change human nature and become posthuman. Recent advances in the neurosciences and biotechnology have fueled these hopes. Christians rightly recoil from attempts to change human nature because we recognize the fundamental importance of being created in the image of God. David B. Fletcher has pointed out that certain of these technological advances would alter the moral standing of “engineered” individuals, because they “would no longer straightforwardly be persons, but would in fact be in important respects, things.”[1] This line of reasoning is consistent with a long philosophical tradition that holds that the mind is the sine qua non of personhood and that it is personhood that grants one membership to the moral community.

Podcast Episode: 
63

Chiseling Away at David

Michelangelo’s David is a fitting metaphor for what it means to be human.  Considering assisted reproductive technologies, genetic testing and intervention, and using technology for purposes beyond therapy, we are chiseling away at the David that we know.  A brief look at the art and the science through the lens of bioethics is the theme of this presentation.

Podcast Episode: 
60

Human 2.0: Transhumanism as a Cultural Product -- Part 3

In this edition of The Bioethics Podcast, Matthew Eppinette, MA, MBA, concludes a three-part audio adaptation of his essay, “Human 2.0: Transhumanism as a Cultural Trend.” This essay was published by Baker Academic in Everyday Theology: How to Read Cultural Texts and Interpret Trends, a volume co-edited by CBHD’s Managing Director and Research Scholar, Michael Sleasman, along with Kevin Vanhoozer and Charles Anderson.

Podcast Episode: 
55

Human 2.0: Transhumanism as a Cultural Product -- Part 2

In this edition of The Bioethics Podcast, Matthew Eppinette, MA, MBA, continues with the second of a three-part audio adaptation of his essay, “Human 2.0: Transhumanism as a Cultural Trend.” This essay was published by Baker Academic in Everyday Theology: How to Read Cultural Texts and Interpret Trends, a volume co-edited by CBHD’s Managing Director and Research Scholar, Michael Sleasman, along with Kevin Vanhoozer and Charles Anderson.

Podcast Episode: 
53

Human 2.0: Transhumanism as a Cultural Product -- Part 1

In this edition of The Bioethics Podcast, Matthew Eppinette, MA, MBA, begins the first of a three-part audio adaptation of his essay, “Human 2.0: Transhumanism as a Cultural Trend.” This essay was published by Baker Academic in Everyday Theology: How to Read Cultural Texts and Interpret Trends, a volume co-edited by CBHD’s Managing Director and Research Scholar, Michael Sleasman, along with Kevin Vanhoozer and Charles Anderson.

Podcast Episode: 
51

Materias grises: La iluminación del gris

Eric Kandel, investigador pionero de los mecanismos moleculares de la memoria, comentó una vez: "Somos quienes somos en gran medida por lo que hemos aprendido y lo que recordamos"[1] Si la materia gris forma la urdimbre y la trama de la biografía, la individualidad, la racionalidad y la capacidad creativa personal, ¿debemos concluir entonces que todo lo que podamos hacer para aumentar la función cognitiva nos convertiría en mejores personas?

Podcast Episode: 
46

Grey Matters: The Matter of Brightened Grey

Eric Kandel, pioneer investigator of the molecular mechanisms of memory, once commented, "We are who we are in good measure because of what we have learned and what we remember.1 If grey matter forms the warp and woof of personal biography, individuality, rationality and creative capacity, does it then follow that whatever we can do to augment cognitive function would make us better persons?

Podcast Episode: 
46

Encontrar lo humano en la bioética cristiana

Traducción: Alejandro Field

¿Es esto, por cierto, amor: querer encontrarlo fuera de uno mismo? Yo pensaba que esto es amor: traer amor junto con uno. Pero quien trae amor junto con uno al buscar un objeto para su amor (en caso contrario, es mentira que esté buscando un objeto para su amor) encontrará fácilmente, y más fácilmente cuanto mayor es el amor en él, el objeto, y encontrará que es algo capaz de ser amado.

-- Kierkegaard, Las obras del amor.

Podcast Episode: 
10

Finding the Human in Christian Bioethics

Is this indeed love, to want to find it outside oneself? I thought that this is love, to bring love along with oneself. But the one who brings love along with himself as he searches for an object for his love (otherwise it is a lie that he is searching for an object — for his love) will easily, and the more easily the greater the love in him, find the object and find it to be such that it is lovable.

-- Kierkegaard,Works of Love, 157.

Podcast Episode: 
10

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