Human Enhancement

Extending Human Life to What End: Ethical Reflections on Regenerative Medicine (Part 1)

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  • Length: 28:27 minutes (32.58 MB)
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The first part of a 2004 lecture by Brent Waters, DPhil, originally delivered on the campus of Trinity International University. The lecture is entitled “Extending Human Life to what End: Ethical Reflections on Regenerative Medicine.”

Podcast Episode: 
104

Thinking through Technology Part III

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  • Length: 21:43 minutes (9.95 MB)
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As a roadmap of where we are heading, here are a few guideposts. First, we will set the stage surveying the current landscape in technological innovation generally speaking. We, then, will turn our attention to discern the nature of technology and to mine the resources of two fields of study likely unfamiliar to many of us (i.e., philosophy of technology and computer ethics) in a section entitled “In Search of a Philosophy of Technology.” While you might be surprised to hear that such a field as computer ethics exists, the issues presented by the convergence of bioethics with communication and information technologies make an understanding of this field critically important. Finally, we will offer some preliminary questions and assessments of the emerging biotech discussion with particular interest in those issues that focus on the remaking of humanity under the rubric of technological responsibilism. My working proposal is that many of the difficulties presenting us with these emerging technologies focus on our underlying inability to assess technology and its relationship to humanity, and that much of this can be alleviated by some attention to a philosophy and more importantly a theology of technology.

Podcast Episode: 
95

Thinking through Technology Part II

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  • Length: 16:49 minutes (7.71 MB)
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As a roadmap of where we are heading, here are a few guideposts. First, we will set the stage surveying the current landscape in technological innovation generally speaking. We, then, will turn our attention to discern the nature of technology and to mine the resources of two fields of study likely unfamiliar to many of us (i.e., philosophy of technology and computer ethics) in a section entitled “In Search of a Philosophy of Technology.” While you might be surprised to hear that such a field as computer ethics exists, the issues presented by the convergence of bioethics with communication and information technologies make an understanding of this field critically important. Finally, we will offer some preliminary questions and assessments of the emerging biotech discussion with particular interest in those issues that focus on the remaking of humanity under the rubric of technological responsibilism. My working proposal is that many of the difficulties presenting us with these emerging technologies focus on our underlying inability to assess technology and its relationship to humanity, and that much of this can be alleviated by some attention to a philosophy and more importantly a theology of technology.

Podcast Episode: 
94

Thinking through Technology Part I

As a roadmap of where we are heading, here are a few guideposts. First, we will set the stage surveying the current landscape in technological innovation generally speaking. We, then, will turn our attention to discern the nature of technology and to mine the resources of two fields of study likely unfamiliar to many of us (i.e., philosophy of technology and computer ethics) in a section entitled “In Search of a Philosophy of Technology.” While you might be surprised to hear that such a field as computer ethics exists, the issues presented by the convergence of bioethics with communication and information technologies make an understanding of this field critically important. Finally, we will offer some preliminary questions and assessments of the emerging biotech discussion with particular interest in those issues that focus on the remaking of humanity under the rubric of technological responsibilism. My working proposal is that many of the difficulties presenting us with these emerging technologies focus on our underlying inability to assess technology and its relationship to humanity, and that much of this can be alleviated by some attention to a philosophy and more importantly a theology of technology.

Podcast Episode: 
93

三思科技(全)

  

  

Podcast Episode: 
93

Beyond Perfectionism

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  • Length: 9:22 minutes (10.73 MB)
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With the Olympics soundly behind us and the rhythms of the fall launch of new television episodes well established, several reflections come to mind. An interesting thread below all of the accomplishments of the  elite athletes during the Beijing Olympics were concerns over doping of various sorts. Artificial enhancements, steroids, hormones. These are not new issues surrounding the elite athletic competitions of our day, but they increasingly are becoming difficult to evaluate.

Podcast Episode: 
102

Is Aging a Disease Worth Fighting?

Few people would have moral problems with research to find the genetic links to aging and to age-related diseases. Alzheimer's disease, atherosclerosis, cancer, and other illnesses generally associated with aging are clearly worth fighting. So the news that University of Illinois researchers have found a single gene, "p21," that might be linked to age-related diseases is, all things being equal, good news.

Podcast Episode: 
77

Transhumanism and the Convergence of Emerging Technologies

Editor's Note: Parallel Paper Presentation from CBHD's 2007 Annual Conference, Bioethics Nexus: The Future of Healthcare, Science and Humanity.

Podcast Episode: 
65

Genetically Enhancing Athletes?

Readers of both the academic and popular literature in bioethics will be well aware that genetic and other forms of so-called human enhancement are clearly on the drawing board. No one knows how long it will take to develop these technologies, but they are most certainly coming. Already, of course, through the use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis, human embryos are screened for undesirable genetic traits and embryos with those traits are not transferred to a woman’s uterus—they are discarded or used in embryo-destructive research.

Podcast Episode: 
67

Dominion, Providence, and Art: The Integral Role of Aesthetics in the Next Phase of Christian Bioethics

For more than a generation, the field of bioethics has dealt with issues of giving and taking human life, defining the nature of the physician-patient relationship, and establishing normative protocols for clinical ethics.  Increasingly, though, these issues are being supplanted with questions surrounding the extent to which human creativity may reshape life.  Should we design animals to have human organs, and vice versa?  Is it permissible to fashion our bodies or the bodies of our children through biomedicine to suit our aesthetic tastes?  Does the Bible give humans permission to reengineer the creation as we see fit?  These questions stretch classical bioethics to the breaking point; we need new wineskins to grapple with these ethical challenges.  This paper will argue that developing aesthetic thought is a necessary step in forming an ethics of biotechnology and human creativity.  Furthermore, the arts offer an invaluable forum for theological and socio-cultural reflection for the next generation of Christian bioethics, as well as a fertile avenue for communication biblical conceptions of human dignity and creativity with those outside of the field.

Podcast Episode: 
64

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