In Mega-Shelter for Harvey Evacuees, Telemedicine Plans to Help Doctors Keep Up; Skepticism Surfaces over CRISPR Human Embryo Editing Claims; Organs on Chips; Pioneering Cancer Drug and More …
September 1, 2017 Donate to CBHD
View in Browser
About CBHD Events Resources
The Bioethics Podcast Bioethics.com
THE BIOETHIC WEEKLY THE CENTER FOR BIOETHICS & HUMAN DIGNITY
RESOURCES & ANNOUNCEMENTS
2017 Conference Audio Sets Now Available
2017 CONFERENCE AUDIO AVAILABLE

Audio for the 2017 summer conference, Genetic & Reproductive Technologies, is now available for purchase. It includes access to the complete conference plenaries and panel discussion along with all parallel paper sessions. Also, audio from our 2016 conference, Transformations in Care, is now being offered at a reduced price.

LEARN MORE>
2017 Orr Fellow
INTRODUCING THE INAUGURAL ORR FELLOW
Michael Cox, PhD (Cand.) has been selected to be the inaugural recipient of CBHD's Robert D. Orr Endowed Fellowship. Michael earned a BA in Biblical Studies from Ouachita Baptist University and a MA in Biblical Exegesis from Wheaton College. He is currently working on a PhD in Theological Studies with an emphasis in Old Testament at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School.  
LEARN MORE>
OTHER BIOETHICS EVENTS
MATTHEW BULFIN EDUCATIONAL CONFERENCE
American College of Pediatricians & AAPLOG
Trinity International University
September 29 – October 1, 2017
Deerfield, IL
LEARN MORE>
NEWS HIGHLIGHTS
In Mega-Shelter for Harvey Evacuees, Telemedicine Plans to Help Doctors Keep Up
(STAT News) — Getting thousands of Houston-area families to shelters has been a massive humanitarian effort. But the aid doesn’t end there: Many of the displaced have chronic medical conditions like asthma or injuries from recent days that need medical attention. Providers of telemedicine are hoping technology can help step into the breach. At Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center in Dallas, which has begun to take residents displaced by flooding in Houston, emergency-room doctors at Children’s Health, a pediatric hospital based in Dallas, are seeing young patients remotely. …
READ MORE>
Skepticism Surfaces over CRISPR Human Embryo Editing Claims
(Science) — But such a feat has not been observed in previous CRISPR experiments, and some scientists are now questioning whether the repairs really happened that way. In a paper published online this week on the preprint server bioRxiv, a group of six geneticists, developmental biologists, and stem cell researchers offers alternative explanations for the results. And uncertainty about exactly how the embryos’ DNA changed after editing leaves many questions about the technique’s safety, they argue. (The authors declined to discuss the paper while it’s being reviewed for publication.) …
READ MORE>
FDA Approves First Gene Therapy for Leukemia
(NPR) — The Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday announced what the agency calls a “historic action” — the first approval of a cell-based gene therapy in the United States. The FDA approved Kymriah, which scientists refer to as a “living drug” because it involves using genetically modified immune cells from patients to attack their cancer. The drug was approved to treat children and young adults up to age 25 suffering from a form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia who do not respond to standard treatment or have suffered relapses. …
READ MORE>
With a Simple DNA Test, Family Histories Are Rewritten
(New York Times) — The question of ethnicity is enmeshed with another difficult challenge for DNA testers: geography. Genetics researchers generally know which DNA sequences originated on which continents. But pinpointing a particular country of origin, as many testing services claim to do, is far trickier. Scientists simply do not have good data on the genetic characteristics of particular countries in, say, East Africa or East Asia. Even in more developed regions, distinguishing between Polish and, for instance, Russian heritage is inexact at best. …
READ MORE>
Why People May Have Pig Organs inside Them One Day
(TIME) — The findings have obvious implications for the many people waiting for a transplant. But one of the lead study authors, George Church, a geneticist at Harvard and founder of eGenesis, says the promise of pig organs that are compatible with humans may be even bigger. If pig organs could be engineered to be even healthier and more durable than the average human organ—which Church believes is possible—they could have a profound effect on human health and longevity, he says. …
READ MORE>
Why Teens Need to Understand Care Plans for Dying Parents
(Reuters) — When children lose a parent during adolescence, their mental health as young adults may depend on how comfortable they were with the treatment and support provided at the end of their parents’ lives, a recent study suggests. To understand the lasting psychological impact of the death of a parent during adolescence, researchers surveyed young adults who had lost a parent to cancer six to nine years earlier, when they were 13 to 16 years old. …
READ MORE>
Pioneering Cancer Drug, Just Approved, to Cost $475,000–and Analysts Say It’s a Bargain
(STAT News) — The Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday approved a futuristic new approach to treating cancer, clearing a Novartis therapy that has produced unprecedented results in patients with a rare and deadly cancer. The price tag: $475,000 for a course of treatment. That sounds staggering to many patients — but it’s far less than analysts expected. The therapy, called a CAR-T, is made by harvesting patients’ white blood cells and rewiring them to home in on tumors. Novartis’s product is the first CAR-T therapy to come before the FDA, leading a pack of novel treatments that promise to change the standard of care for certain aggressive blood cancers. …
READ MORE>
Organs on Chips
(The Scientist) — From beating hearts to breathing lungs, organs-on-chips are some of hottest new tools for human biology research. Although these devices may bear closer resemblance to computer components than human body parts, scientists have now created working models for a whole range of organs, including the liver, the lung, and even the female reproductive system. Researchers hope to use these devices to model disease and facilitate drug development. “I think for most people, the goal is to replace animal testing and to carry out personalized medicine in a more effective way,” Donald Ingber, the founding director of the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, tells The Scientist. …
READ MORE>
Note: News stories and events do not necessarily represent the Center's views. For additional commentary on many of the issues they raise, please see the CBHD web site at www.cbhd.org. Please visit www.bioethics.com for daily posts on bioethics news and issues.
THE CENTER FOR BIOETHICS & HUMAN DIGNITY TRINITY INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY
Follow CBHD
facebook linkedin twitter twitter youtube google
Stay current in bioethics news.
Follow or subscribe to bioethics.com
twitter rss
2065 Half Day Rd, Deerfield, IL 60015 USA
v 847.317.8180 f 847.317.8101 e info@cbhd.org
Copyright ©2017 The Center for Bioethics & Human Dignity