Insulin Price Hikes Tell Us a Lot about What’s Wrong with Drug Pricing in America; Synthetic Bone Implant Could Replace Painful Marrow Transplants; Now That We Can Read Genomes, Can We Write Them?; Sales Executive for Opioid Maker Was Addicted to the Drug He Promoted …
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ACADEMY OF FELLOWS VIDEO FOOTAGE

Video footage from all six presentations at the 2017 Academy of Fellows consultation is now available on CBHD's Youtube Channel. Hear from leading experts like William P. Cheshire, MD, MA, FAAN, and Patrick Smith, PhD on the consultation topic, "Bioethics & Being Human."

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Genetic & Reproductive Technologies Conference
6 WEEKS UNTIL SUMMER CONFERENCE
CBHD's summer conference, Genetic & Reproductive Technologies is only six weeks away. Join us as we explore developments and ethical and theological implications in genetic and reproductive technologies. Check out our website for a list of courses and workshops that will be offered in conjunction with the conference, as well as a list of our confirmed plenary speakers.
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NEWS HIGHLIGHTS
Insulin Price Hikes Tell Us a Lot about What’s Wrong with Drug Pricing in America
(Vox) — When inventor Frederick Banting discovered insulin in 1923, he refused to put his name on the patent. He felt it was unethical for a doctor to profit off a discovery that would save lives. Banting’s co-inventors, James Collip and Charles Best, sold the insulin patent to the University of Toronto for a mere $1. They also wanted everyone who needed their medication to be able to afford it. Today Banting and colleagues would be spinning in their graves: Their drug, which 30 million American diabetics rely on, has become the latest poster child for pharmaceutical price gouging …
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Synthetic Bone Implant Could Replace Painful Marrow Transplants
(Gizmodo) — Thanks to advances in medicine, bone marrow transplants are no longer the last resorts they once were. Every year, thousands of marrow transplants are performed, a common treatment for ailments from bone marrow disease to leukemia. But because they first require a patient undergo radiation to kill off any existing bone marrow stem cells, marrow transplants remain incredibly hard on a patient. Now, engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a synthetic bone implant with functional marrow able to produce its own blood cells. …
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Universities Must Do More to Tackle Use of Smart Drugs, Say Experts
(The Guardian) — Universities must do more to tackle the growing number of students turning to “smart drugs” to cope with exam stress, leading academics have said. UK institutions are being called on to consider measures such as drug testing to stem the rise of cognitive enhancement drugs being used by young people to improve their academic performance. As hundreds of thousands of students across the UK prepare to sit their summer exams in coming weeks, Thomas Lancaster, an associate dean at Staffordshire University, said we were entering a “dangerous world” where students have access to the “study drugs” …
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Now That We Can Read Genomes, Can We Write Them?
(The Atlantic) — Since the Human Genome Project (HGP) was completed in 2003, scientists have sequenced the full genomes of hundreds, perhaps thousands, of species. Octopuses. Barley. Mosquitoes. Birch trees. Reading genomes is now commonplace, but that’s not enough for the group of scientists who gathered at the New York Genome Center on Tuesday. They want to write entire genomes with the same ease, synthesizing them from scratch and implanting them into hollow cells. One team already did this for a tiny bacterium in 2010, creating a synthetic cell called Synthia …
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FDA Proposes That Doctors Learn about Acupuncture for Pain Management
(STAT News) — Chiropractors and acupuncturists who have lobbied for a bigger role in treating pain have won a preliminary endorsement from federal health officials. The Food and Drug Administration released proposed changes Wednesday to its blueprint on educating health care providers about treating pain. The guidelines now recommend that doctors get information about chiropractic care and acupuncture as therapies that might help patients avoid prescription opioids …
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ADHD Treatment Tied to Lower Car Crash Risk
(Reuters) — People with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are already at increased risk of motor vehicle accidents, but it is significantly reduced when they are taking ADHD medication, a 10-year study finds. The researchers estimate that one in five of the vehicle accidents among more than 2 million people with ADHD during the study period could have been avoided if these individuals had been receiving medication the entire time …
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Underlying Molecular Mechanism of Bipolar Disorder Revealed
(Medical Xpress) — The study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), utilized human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPS cells) to map lithium’s response pathway, enabling the larger pathogenesis of bipolar disorder to be identified. These results are the first to explain the molecular basis of the disease, and may support the development of a diagnostic test for the disorder as well as predict the likelihood of patient response to lithium treatment …
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Sales Executive for Opioid Maker Was Addicted to the Drug He Promoted
(STAT News) — As a district sales manager for Insys Therapeutics, Jeffrey Pearlman led a team that aggressively pushed doctors to widely prescribe the company’s highly addictive opioid painkiller Subsys. He even threatened to stop paying a nurse speaking fees if she didn’t help boost sales of the drug, emails show. All the while, Pearlman held a secret: He himself was addicted to opioids like the very ones he was promoting. Pearlman’s daily regimen of painkillers included the highest doses of his company’s own product …
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Note: News stories and events do not necessarily represent the Center’s views. For additional commentary on many of the issues they raise, please see the CBHD web site at www.cbhd.org. Please visit www.bioethics.com for daily posts on bioethics news and issues.
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