Doctors Attempt First Case of Gene Editing Inside the Body of a Living Human; Digital Pills That Connect to Your Smartphone; Gene Therapy for Blindness May Soon Be Reality; FDA Clears Electronic Earpiece to Block Opioid Withdrawal Symptoms, and More …
November 17, 2017 Donate to CBHD
View in Browser
About CBHD Events Resources
The Bioethics Podcast Bioethics.com
THE BIOETHIC WEEKLY THE CENTER FOR BIOETHICS & HUMAN DIGNITY
RESOURCES & ANNOUNCEMENTS
From Personalized Medicine to Consumer-Driven Testing Article Image
A CLOSER LOOK AT DIRECT-TO-CONSUMER GENETIC TESTS
Direct-to-consumer genetic tests are on the rise. Some are even being offered in places as common as sport games. Dr. Michelle Kirtley, CBHD Bioethics & Public Policy Associate, examines the implications of such medical testing in her recently released article from the Dignitas archives.
LEARN MORE>
CBHD Membership
CBHD 2018 MEMBERSHIP
Being a member of The Center for Bioethics & Human Dignity comes with many perks: including a one-year subscription to Dignitas (the Center's quarterly publication), an annual Special Report examining controversial or emerging issues, and a print subscription to Ethics & Medicine: An International Journal of Bioethics. In addition, CBHD members receive unlimited access to the Center's Dignitas and premium content archives, a substantial discount to the annual summer conference, and more! Sign up now for an additional month of online access.
LEARN MORE>
NEWS HIGHLIGHTS
Doctors Are Attempting the First Case of Gene Editing Inside the Body of a Living Human
(Quartz) — But Madeux’s life might be about to change. He is the first patient to receive an experimental gene therapy as part of a clinical trial. Earlier this week, Sangamo Therapeutics injected Madeux with viruses containing a package of gene-editing material, according to the AP. The hope is that these viruses will enter Madeux’s cells, specifically liver cells, inject the missing gene at the right place in his DNA. Only about 1% of the liver’s cells need to be fixed, and give his liver the ability to produce the enzyme he has been missing all his life. …
READ MORE>
US Health Agency to Crack Down on Risky Stem Cell Offerings
(ABC News) — U.S. health authorities announced plans Thursday to crack down on doctors pushing stem cell procedures that pose the gravest risks to patients amid an effort to police a burgeoning medical field that previously has received little oversight. The Food and Drug Administration laid out a strategy for regulating cell-based medicine, including hundreds of private clinics that have opened across the nation in the last decade. Many of the businesses promote stem cell injections for dozens of diseases including arthritis, multiple sclerosis and even Alzheimer’s. They can cost $5,000 to $50,000, but there’s little research that such procedures are safe or effective. …
READ MORE>
A New Study Found a Big Problem with a Popular Opioid Addiction Medication
(VOX) — For the first time, a new study in The Lancet, sponsored by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), compared the effectiveness of naltrexone with buprenorphine in the US. The results were both promising and disappointing. While naltrexone is as effective as buprenorphine once treatment begins, it is also significantly more difficult to actually start naltrexone because it requires an extensive detox period — which can span more than a week — that buprenorphine does not. …
READ MORE>
Pros and Cons of the New Digital Pills That Connect to Your Smartphone
(Quartz) — The health-care community lit up in conversation after news broke that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the world’s first digital drug. It’s a pill that contains a minuscule chip—made of magnesium, silicon, and copper—that can send information from inside the body to an adhesive patch that’s placed on a patient’s torso. The patch can send data to a doctor’s office, as well as to a special smartphone app for those who wish to monitor themselves, until the chip is naturally digested. …
READ MORE>
New Gene Therapy for Blindness May Soon Be Reality
(News-Medical) — Patients who had lost their sight to an inherited retinal disease could see well enough to navigate a maze after being treated with a new gene therapy, according to research presented today at AAO 2017, the 121st Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Patients in the study had a condition called Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), which begins in infancy and progresses slowly, eventually causing complete blindness. This new, first-of-its-kind gene therapy is currently under review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for potential approval this year. There are currently no treatments available for inherited retinal diseases. …
READ MORE>
FDA Clears Electronic Earpiece to Block Opioid Withdrawal Symptoms
(STAT News) — A wearable device claiming to block the pain of opioid withdrawal has been cleared by the Food and Drug Administration under an expedited review process for medical devices. However, patient safety advocates note that the device has limited evidence for its effectiveness. The NSS-2 Bridge is a device that attaches to the ear and transmits small electrical pulses through four cranial nerves. It’s marketed by Indiana-based Innovative Health Solutions, and was cleared to treat chronic and acute pain in 2014. IHS can now market the device as one that reduces symptoms of opioid withdrawal including nausea, anxiety, and aches.. …
READ MORE>
Parents Reach Settlement with IVF Clinic after Sons Were Born with Genetic Condition Fragile X Syndrome
(Sydney Morning Herald) — Before she had her two sons, Leighee Eastbury was told she wasn’t a carrier for Fragile X syndrome, a genetic condition that her boys will now live with for the rest of their lives. It wasn’t until her oldest son Hayden was a toddler that Ms Eastbury learned that she was in fact a carrier and both her boys were affected by the condition which causes intellectual disability. “I was devastated, absolutely devastated, it was something I had a test for … you base all your family planning and everything off that test,” she told reporters on Monday in Sydney. …
READ MORE>
FDA Issues Strong Warning against Kratom, an Herbal Supplement Used to Treat Pain and Other Conditions?
(STAT News) — The Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday issued a public health advisory about the potential risks of an herbal supplement called kratom, warning that people who use it to treat pain in place of opioids or to wean themselves off opioids are exposing themselves to an unregulated product that has not been proven safe or effective. The announcement from FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb is sure to rile devoted kratom users, who contend the supplement has provided them with a way to manage pain, anxiety, and a range of other conditions. …
READ MORE>
Note: News stories and events do not necessarily represent the Center's views. For additional commentary on many of the issues they raise, please see the CBHD web site at www.cbhd.org. Please visit www.bioethics.com for daily posts on bioethics news and issues.
THE CENTER FOR BIOETHICS & HUMAN DIGNITY TRINITY INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY
Follow CBHD
facebook linkedin twitter twitter youtube google
Stay current in bioethics news.
Follow or subscribe to bioethics.com
twitter rss
2065 Half Day Rd, Deerfield, IL 60015 USA
v 847.317.8180 f 847.317.8101 e info@cbhd.org
Copyright ©2017 The Center for Bioethics & Human Dignity