Doctors Get Their Own Second Opinions; Gene Expression Study Raises Thorny Ethical Issues; Puerto Rico Investigates Post-Hurricane Disease Outbreak; Seeing Hope: FDA Panel Considers Gene Therapy for Blindness and More …
October 13, 2017 Donate to CBHD
View in Browser
About CBHD Events Resources
The Bioethics Podcast Bioethics.com
THE BIOETHIC WEEKLY THE CENTER FOR BIOETHICS & HUMAN DIGNITY
RESOURCES & ANNOUNCEMENTS
CBHD Membership
CBHD 2018 MEMBERSHIP
​Being a member of The Center for Bioethics & Human Dignity comes with many perks including a one-year subscription to Dignitas (the Center's quarterly publication), an annual Special Report examining controversial or emerging issues, and a print subscription to Ethics & Medicine: An International Journal of Bioethics. In addition, CBHD members receive unlimited access to the Center's Dignitas and premium content archives, a substantial discount to the annual summer conference, and more! Sign up now for an additional quarter of online access.
LEARN MORE>
CBHD Student Paper Competition
INAUGURAL CBHD STUDENT PAPER COMPETITION
CBHD is holding its first Student Paper Competition in conjunction with its annual conference. Undergraduate, graduate, seminary, and doctoral students are invited to engage questions from a Christian perspective associated with foundational or emerging issues raised at the intersections of medicine, science, technology, and our common humanity. The winning paper will be published in the Center’s quarterly publication. In addition, the author of the paper will receive a complimentary conference registration, cash prize, and the opportunity to present the paper during a parallel paper session at the conference.
LEARN MORE>
OTHER BIOETHICS EVENTS
BIOETHICS: BIBLICAL PRINICIPLES AND MINISTRY APPLICATIONS
Reformed Theological Seminary Washington
October 13 – 14, 2017
McLean, VA
LEARN MORE>
NEWS HIGHLIGHTS
To Accelerate New Cancer Treatments, NIH Will Team Up with Pharma on Immunotherapy Research
(STAT News) — The National Institutes of Health on Thursday announced a $215 million public-private partnership with 11 pharmaceutical companies in what the agency bills as a significant next step in its cancer moonshot. The Partnership for Accelerating Cancer Therapies, or PACT, is a five-year agreement to push ahead with research that seeks to “identify, develop and validate robust biomarkers — standardized biological markers of disease and treatment response — to advance new immunotherapy treatments that harness the immune system to attack cancer,” the agency said. …
READ MORE>
The Rise and Fall and Rise again of 23andMe
(Nature) — 23andme has always been the most visible face of direct-to-consumer genetic testing, and it is more formidable now than ever before. In September, the company announced that it had raised US$250 million: more than the total amount of capital raised by the company since its inception. Investors estimate that it is worth more than $1 billion, making it a ‘unicorn’ in Silicon Valley parlance — a rare and valuable thing to behold. But for scientists, 23andme’s real worth is in its data. With more than 2 million customers, the company hosts by far the largest collection of gene-linked health data anywhere. It has racked up 80 publications, signed more than 20 partnerships with pharmaceutical firms and started a therapeutics division of its own. …
READ MORE>
Puerto Rico Investigates Post-Hurricane Disease Outbreak
(STAT News) — Four deaths in Hurricane Maria’s aftermath are being investigated as possible cases of a disease spread by animals’ urine, Puerto Rico’s governor said Wednesday amid concerns about islanders’ exposure to contaminated water. A total of 10 people have come down with suspected cases of leptospirosis, Gov. Ricardo Rossello said at a news conference. On a U.S. territory where a third of customers remain without running water three weeks after the hurricane, some became ill after turning to local streams to relieve their thirst. …
READ MORE>
Doctors Get Their Own Second Opinions
(The Atlantic) — Human Dx might help doctors confirm their suspected diagnoses or think of things to rule out. At Mary’s Center, one man came in complaining of headaches and nausea, and the Human Dx physicians suggested a blood test called an ESR. Another time, Nundy used it to confirm a suspected case of rheumatoid arthritis before putting a low-income patient on a heavy-duty course of medications. Experienced doctors use Human Dx for their most difficult cases, and newer providers use it to hone their skills. Johns Hopkins Hospital and other teaching hospitals are now using it to train medical residents. …
READ MORE>
Gene Expression Study Raises Thorny Ethical Issues
(Nature) — Ronald’s myriad tissues, and those of almost 1,000 other anonymous deceased donors, are now the basis of a first-of-its-kind database. Supported by the US National Institutes of Health, the US$150-million Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project is amassing data about gene sequences and activity, and other information, across 44 types of tissue, from blood vessels to 10 different brain regions. “It’s creating a ‘Google Maps’ of the body,” says Kristin Ardlie, a geneticist at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard in Cambridge, Massachusetts, who is part of the project’s data-analysis team. It routinely releases new data, which are freely available to qualified researchers. …
READ MORE>
Fertility MOT Tests ‘A Waste of Money’
(BBC) — Fertility tests marketed at women worried they have left it too late to have a baby, can be a “waste of money”. Ovarian reserve tests, which can cost £100 or more, measure hormones in blood to give an idea of how many eggs a woman has. Latest research in the Journal of the American Medical Association found the tests did not predict a woman’s chance of conceiving, however. Women must be told this, experts say. The tests were originally developed by IVF clinics to predict how a woman having fertility treatment might respond to the drugs used to stimulate the ovaries to produce eggs. But some companies have been marketing them to women as a fertility MOT. …
READ MORE>
Seeing Hope: FDA Panel Considers Gene Therapy for Blindness
(ABC News) — On Thursday, U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisers will consider whether to recommend approval of a gene therapy that improved vision for these three youths and some others with hereditary blindness. It would be the first gene therapy in the U.S. for an inherited disease, and the first in which a corrective gene is given directly to a patient. Only one gene therapy is sold in the U.S. now, a cancer treatment approved in August that engineers patients’ blood cells in the lab. …
READ MORE>
Navajo Nation Reconsiders Ban on Genetic Research
(Nature) — When the Navajo Nation opens its first oncology centre next year in Tuba City, Arizona, clinicians there may be able to offer a service that has been banned on tribal lands for 15 years: analyzing the DNA of Navajo tribe members to guide treatments and study the genetic roots of disease. That’s because the Navajo, the second-largest Native American group in the United States, are considering whether to lift their longstanding moratorium on genetic research. The tribal government banned DNA studies in 2002 to prevent the misuse of its members’ genetic material. …
READ MORE>
Note: News stories and events do not necessarily represent the Center's views. For additional commentary on many of the issues they raise, please see the CBHD web site at www.cbhd.org. Please visit www.bioethics.com for daily posts on bioethics news and issues.
THE CENTER FOR BIOETHICS & HUMAN DIGNITY TRINITY INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY
Follow CBHD
facebook linkedin twitter twitter youtube google
Stay current in bioethics news.
Follow or subscribe to bioethics.com
twitter rss
2065 Half Day Rd, Deerfield, IL 60015 USA
v 847.317.8180 f 847.317.8101 e info@cbhd.org
Copyright ©2017 The Center for Bioethics & Human Dignity