The Ethics of a Brave New World: A Response to ‘Baby-Making'

 

First published in 1932, Brave New World examines the possible implications of a society based on genetically programmed babies, unrestricted sexual promiscuity, and reliance on entertainment and drugs as ways to escape from reality. Reflecting on the warnings sounded by Brave New World, Huxley wrote, “All things considered it looks as though were far closer to us than anyone, only fifteen years ago, could have imagined. Then, I projected it 600 years into the future. Today it seems quite possible that the horror may be upon us within a single century.” The presentation offers a thought-provoking examination of the impact of science, entertainment, and social change on what it means to be human. This presentation was part of an evening event co-sponsored by CBHD and the Trinity International University Drama Department in Spring 2011. Dr. Linholm’s presentation was offered in response to a lecture by CBHD executive director, Paige Comstock Cunningham, JD, titled “Baby-Making: The Fractured Fulfillment of Huxley’s Brave New World.”

Links to Related Resources:

“Baby-Making Pt.1: The Fractured Fulfillment of Huxley’s Brave New World.”
“Baby-Making Pt.2: The Fractured Fulfillment of Huxley’s Brave New World.”

 

Podcast Episode: 
161