The Bioethics Podcast 2010

The Bioethics Podcast is an audio resource exploring the pressing bioethical challenges of our day featuring staff, fellows, and associates of The Center for Bioethics & Human Dignity. For more information, click here for The Bioethics Podcast FAQ

Grey Matters: Does Alien Hand Syndrome Refute Free Will?

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Neuroscience opens many fascinating windows into human nature. In the quest to understand human consciousness, volition, and intentionality, there is much to learn from studying even the brain’s flaws and failures.

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154

The Changing Conscience of Healthcare: Vows vs. Laws in the Anatomy of a Profession

This paper considers the concept of conscience from an individual as well as a corporate perspective, examining both what it is and what it is not. It will consider the impact that changes in our healthcare system, particularly the regulation of moral determinations and the ways in which such regulations alter the object of professional obligations, will have on the concept of medicine as a profession.

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153

The Need to Know: Disclosure of Information to Pediatric Patients

Should a nine-year old patient be told about her terminal medical condition?

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152

Reproductive Ethics in an Abortion Driven Culture: Not for Women Only

This lecture was originally delivered as part of the Spring 2010 Bioethics Colloquia hosted by Trinity Graduate School.

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151

The Christian Hippocratic Tradition in Medicine

To some people it may seem anachronistic that the aim of Ethics & Medicine is to ‘reassert the Hippocratic consensus in medicine as seen through the lens of the Judeo-Christian tradition.’ What is Hippocratic medicine?
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150

Forced Sterilization of Native Americans: Late Twentieth Century Physician Cooperation with National Eugenic Policies

The protracted policy directed against the United States of America’s indigenous peoples represented misguided governments, widespread greed, and enforcement by an at times ruthless, undisciplined military. A recent, albeit weakly publicized, continuation of this policy has been played out in a bioethical arena. Indeed, after the Nuremberg Trials and an explicit international consensus, this would be considered anathema. On view is the evil of forced abortions and sterilizations. This two-pronged approach to knowingly limit births in selected populations was emblematic of eugenic policy in the early to mid-twentieth century. Unfortunately, eugenic birth control had been resuscitated as late as the 1970s through voluntary physician complicity with an immoral national eugenic policy.

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149

On Human Bioenhancements

Human beings are obsessive innovators. Homo sapiens (knower) is by nature Homo faber (fabricator). Life without what philosopher Michael Novak has called ‘the fire of invention’ doubtless would be nasty, bloody, and brutish. Since biomedicine and biotechnology are two spheres where innovation is especially rewarded, it is no surprise that we stand on the threshold of the development of human biological enhancements.

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148

The Slippery Slope of Normality: Lessons from Neuroethics (Part 2)

This lecture was originally delivered as a combined institute session during our 2009 preconference institutes. In this part of the lecture Dr. Cheshire explores the nature of slippery slope arguments, the meaning of normality, developments in cognitive enhancement, and arguments in favor of neuroenhancement.

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147

The Slippery Slope of Normality: Lessons from Neuroethics (Part 1)

This lecture was originally delivered as a combined institute session during our 2009 preconference institutes. In this part of the lecture Dr. Cheshire explores the nature of slippery slope arguments, the meaning of normality, developments in cognitive enhancement, and arguments in favor of neuroenhancement.

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146

Grey Matters: Just Enhancement

As the United States considers how best to restrain the growth of healthcare costs while ensuring quality and access, the potential economic impact of proposals for enhancement medicine should not be overlooked. This essay makes the case that the practice of neuroenhancement, if it were to become widespread, would infringe upon the ethical principle of distributive justice.

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144

Life on Ice: The Landscape of Embryo Donation and Adoption (Part 3)

The emerging field of embryo donation and adoption presents a variety of ethical issues as an alternative to other contemporary fertility treatments. This lecture explores the landscape of options available in embryo donation and adoption, as well as raises the key ethical and legal issues related to the transfer of embryos.

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143

Life on Ice: The Landscape of Embryo Donation and Adoption (Part 2)

The emerging field of embryo donation and adoption presents a variety of ethical issues as an alternative to other contemporary fertility treatments. This lecture explores the landscape of options available in embryo donation and adoption, as well as raises the key ethical and legal issues related to the transfer of embryos.

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142

Life on Ice: The Landscape of Embryo Donation and Adoption (Part 1)

he emerging field of embryo donation and adoption presents a variety of ethical issues as an alternative to other contemporary fertility treatments. This lecture explores the landscape of options available in embryo donation and adoption, as well as raises the key ethical and legal issues related to the transfer of embryos.

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141

To Dialyze or Not to Dialyze

Is it mandatory to dialyze a combative patient who is a threat to himself and to others?
 
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140

Sanctifying Life in the Early Church

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Evidence from both Christian and pagan sources reveals that the pre-Constantinian Christian churches practiced a broad and holistic sanctity-of-life ethic. A review of the documents can only deepen our confidence that a sanctity-of-life ethic is neither a modern nor merely a political innovation but instead goes back to the very origins of our tradition. But the very comprehensive nature of that ethic challenges our truncated contemporary versions, in which conservatives tend to pick out birth and end-of-life concerns and liberals focus on issues like hunger, war, and racism.

Podcast Episode: 
139

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