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Study Finds ‘Striking’ Use of Double Mastectomy

December 21, 2016

(Science Daily) – Nearly half of early stage breast cancer patients considered having double mastectomy and one in six received it — including many who were at low risk of developing a second breast cancer, a new study finds. Many patients who chose double mastectomy demonstrated little knowledge of the lack of benefit this aggressive procedure has for most patients.

If Euthanasia Is a Right, Should Hospices Be Made to Kill?

December 21, 2016

(The Globe and Mail) – Is there any place for conscience in medicine? Currently, the technocratic answer is no. If the state says euthanasia is a right, then euthanasia there must be – and it must be provided everywhere, even by faith-based institutions and by groups that have pledged to care for the most vulnerable people in society. Dr. Constant Leung disagrees. He’s a family physician in Vancouver and his specialty is the elderly. He has persuaded hundreds of old, gravely ill people to accept palliative care in their last weeks or months of life.

Cures Law Requires FDA, HHS to Harmonize Regs

December 21, 2016

(Bloomberg BNA) – Any discrepancies in how the FDA and the HHS regulate human subject research must be resolved over the next three years under a new requirement in the 21st Century Cures law. The biomedical innovation law, which President Barack Obama signed Dec. 13 (Pub. L. No. 114-255), seeks to spur development and approval of new drugs and devices to get them to patients more quickly. While much of the conversation on Cures focused on the billions of dollars in new research money, lawmakers also aimed to remove administrative burdens so scientists can spend more time on their research and less time on paperwork.

A New Edition of The New England Journal of Medicine Is Now Available

December 21, 2016

The New England Journal of Medicine (vol. 375, no. 19, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Meaning and the Nature of Physicians’ Work” by D.I. Rosenthal and A. Verghese
  • “Embodying the Three Rs in Fiji” by A. Creaton

 

A New Edition of Scandinavian Journal of Public Health is Now Available

December 21, 2016

Scandinavian Journal of Public Health (vol. 44, no. 8, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Child Mortality and Poverty in Three World Regions (the West, Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa) 1988–2010: Evidence of Relative Intra-Regional Neglect?” by Colin Pritchard and Steven Keen
  • “Tracking a Female Foetus: Preventing Gender Imbalance in India” by Neelam Dehal, Kewal Krishan, Amarjeet Singh, and Tanuj Kanchan
  • “Changes Over Time in the Risk of Hospitalization for Physical Diseases Among Homeless Men and Women in Stockholm: A Comparison of Two Cohorts”by Ulla Beijer, Daniel Bruce, and Bo Burström

 

A New Edition of Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine Is Now Available

December 21, 2016

Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine (vol. 11, no. 8, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Informed Consent for the Diagnosis of Brain Death: A Conceptual Argument” by Muramoto O

 

A New Edition of Nursing Ethics Is Now Available

December 21, 2016

Nursing Ethics (vol. 23, no. 7, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “What Ethics for Case Managers? Literature Review and Discussion” by Aline Corvol, Grégoire Moutel, and Dominique Somme
  • “The Moral Courage of Nursing Students Who Complete Advance Directives with Homeless Persons” by Woods Nash, Sandra J Mixer, Polly M McArthur, and Annette Mendola
  • “Transplant Tourism and Organ Trafficking: Ethical Implications for the Nursing Profession” by Floraidh AR Corfee
  • “Clinical Group Supervision for Integrating Ethical Reasoning: Views from Students and Supervisors” by Karin Blomberg and Birgitta Bisholt
  • “Difficult Healthcare Transitions: Ethical Analysis and Policy Recommendations for Unrepresented Patients” by Rosalind Abdool, Michael Szego, Daniel Buchman, Leah Justason, Sally Bean, Ann Heesters, Hannah Kaufman, Bob Parke, Frank Wagner, and Jennifer Gibson
  • “Cross-Cultural Validation of the Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire-Revised Chinese Version” by Fei Fei Huang, Qing Yang, Jie Zhang, Qing Hua Zhang, Kaveh Khoshnood, and Jing Ping Zhang
  • “Nurses’ Adherence to Ethical Codes: The Viewpoints of Patients, Nurses, and Managers” by Marzieh Momennasab, Afifeh Rahmanin Koshkaki, Camellia Torabizadeh, and Seyed Ziaeddin Tabei
  • “Ethical Challenges Related to Next of Kin – Nursing Staffs’ Perspective” by Siri Tønnessen, Betty-Ann Solvoll, and Berit Støre Brinchmann

 

A New Edition of European Journal of Human Genetics Is Now Available

December 21, 2016

European Journal of Human Genetics (vol. 24, no. 12, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Role of Pharmacogenetics in Public Health and Clinical Health Care: A SWOT Analysis” by Ritika Kapoor, Wei Chuen Tan-Koi, and Yik-Ying Teo
  • “Who Should Have Access to Genomic Data and How Should They be Held Accountable? Perspectives of Data Access Committee Members and Experts” by Mahsa Shabani, Adrian Thorogood, and Pascal Borry
  • “Whole-Exome Sequencing in Pediatrics: Parents’ Considerations Toward Return of Unsolicited Findings for Their Child” by Candice Cornelis, Aad Tibben, Wybo Dondorp, Mieke van Haelst, Annelien L Bredenoord, Nine Knoers, Marcus Düwell, Ineke Bolt, and Marieke van Summeren

 

A New Edition of International Journal for Quality in Health Care Is Now Available

December 21, 2016

International Journal for Quality in Health Care (Volume 28, No. 5, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Measuring Pediatric Quality of Care in Rural Clinics—A Multi-Country Assessment—Cambodia, Guatemala, Zambia and Kenya” by Anbrasi Edward, Kim Dam, Jane Chege, Annette E. Ghee, Hossein Zare, and Chea Chhorvann
  • “The Effect of Peer Review on Mortality Rates” by W. Krahwinkel, E. Schuler, M. Liebetrau, A. Meier-Hellmann, J. Zacher, R. Kuhlen, and For the HELIOS Medical Board and HELIOS Working Group on Peer Reviewing

 

Faced with Unaffordable Drug Prices, Tens of Millions Buy Medicine Outside U.S.

December 20, 2016

(Kaiser Health News) – As drug prices have spiraled upward in the past decade, tens of millions of generally law-abiding Americans have committed an illegal act in response: They have bought prescriptions outside the U.S. and imported them. One was Debra Miller, of Collinston, La., who traveled to Mexico four times a year for 10 years to get diabetes and blood pressure medicine. She quit in 2011 after the border patrol caught her returning to the U.S. with a three-month supply that had cost her $40. The former truck driver drew a stern warning not to do it again, but got to keep her pills.

World Health Organization Rethinks Its Response to Disease Outbreaks

December 20, 2016

(Nature) – Three years after the start of the world’s worst Ebola epidemic, the World Health Organization (WHO) has created a programme to improve its response to disease outbreaks and to prevent another such calamity. In June, WHO director-general Margaret Chan named medical epidemiologist Peter Salama to lead a new health-emergencies programme intended to streamline the agency’s response to crises. As part of that programme, the WHO has launched the Emerging Diseases Clinical Assessment and Response Network (EDCARN) to provide guidance on how to care for people during disease outbreaks.

Researchers Strengthen the Case for Sexual Transmission of Zika Virus

December 20, 2016

(Medical Xpress) – Aedes aegypti mosquitoes harboring parasitic Zika virus (ZIKV) are the primary transmitters of virus to humans, potentially causing catastrophic congenital microcephaly in babies born to women bitten by infected mosquitoes. But confirmation earlier this year by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that ZIKV can also be sexually transmitted raised new alarm that virus could be passed between sexual partners in venues far from mosquito habitats.

Testing Stem Cells in Tiniest Hearts to Fight Birth Defect

December 20, 2016

(Associated Press) – The 4-month-old on the operating table has a shocking birth defect, nearly half his heart too small or even missing. To save him, surgeons will have to totally reroute how his blood flows, a drastic treatment that doesn’t always work. So this time they are going a step further. In a bold experiment, doctors injected donated stem cells directly into the healthy side of Josue Salinas Salgado’s little heart, aiming to boost its pumping power as it compensates for what’s missing.

Drug Overdose Deaths Rise Dramatically in U.S.

December 20, 2016

(UPI) – Drug overdose deaths continue to surge in the United States, with most fatalities linked to the illicit use of prescription painkillers, new government statistics reveal. Drug overdose deaths increased 23 percent between 2010 and 2014, with more than 47,000 Americans dying in 2014, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) data released Tuesday shows. But updated numbers from the CDC also show that more than 52,000 people died from a drug overdose in 2015, and just over 33,000 of those deaths (63 percent) involved a prescription or illicit opioid.

Laser-Activated Drug Offers New Hope for Prostate Cancer Treatment

December 20, 2016

(CNN) – A new laser-based treatment for prostate cancer has shown promise as a new therapy, without the need for surgery. In a new study, published Tuesday in the Lancet Oncology, scientists at UCL in the UK injected cancer patients with a light-sensitive chemical that, on entry into the prostate, could be activated by lasers to kill cancerous cells, while avoiding the surrounding healthy cells and tissue.

Grilled about Deadly Superbug Outbreaks, Execs at Scope Maker Olympus Take Fifth

December 20, 2016

(Kaiser Health News) – Three senior executives at scope maker Olympus Corp., which is under federal investigation for its role in superbug outbreaks, repeatedly invoked their Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination when questioned recently about internal company emails. The Tokyo executives declined to answer questions about the correspondence during two days of depositions Nov. 30 and Dec. 1 in a civil case against Olympus, according to lawyers representing a Seattle hospital and a patient’s widow.

Zika-Linked Birth Defects More Severe Than Previously Thought, UCLA Researchers Finds

December 20, 2016

(Managed Care Magazine) – A study led by investigators at the University of California, Los Angeles, has found that Zika-linked abnormalities that occur in human fetuses are more extensive—and more severe—than previously thought, with 46% of 125 pregnancies among Zika-infected women resulting in birth defects in newborns or ending in fetal death. The findings, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, suggest that damage during fetal development from the mosquito-borne virus can occur throughout pregnancy and that other birth defects are more common than microcephaly.

A Book on Life and Death Becomes a Best Seller

December 20, 2016

(The Wall Street Journal) – The nonfiction book by Dr. Kalanithi, who died within 22 months of his diagnosis with stage IV lung cancer at age 37, arrived to critical raves. Beyond its literary merits, the memoir owes its success in part to the author’s wife, Lucy Kalanithi, who fulfilled his wish to bring what was then an unfinished manuscript into the world. The book, a meditation on life and death by a brain surgeon determined to understand his own priorities in the face of his terminal illness, moved readers with its insight and courage.

Assisted Dying Could Be Legalised for Over-75s Who Have Had ‘Enough of Life’

December 20, 2016

(Dutch News) – Assisted suicide could be extended to anyone over the age of 75 who no longer wants to live, even if they are not ill, under a bill brought forward by D66 MP Pia Dijkstra. The bill would make it legal to arrange the death of anyone with an ‘intrinsic and consistent’ wish to die. The request would be granted and carried by a registered end-of-life practitioner, which could be a doctor, nurse or psychologist, and they will have to seek a second opinion before deciding.

Can Reproduction Be Ageless?

December 20, 2016

(MIT Technology Review) – It’s well known that more and more women are delaying childbirth until their 30s and 40s to complete their education, pursue careers, or find the right partner. But since a woman’s fertility begins to decline by her late 20s, and even more dramatically after age 35, the result has been an increase in involuntary childlessness. The options for dealing with this have been limited.

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