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A New Edition of Nursing Ethics Is Now Available

May 1, 2017

Nursing Ethics (vol. 24, no. 2, 2017) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Technologies in Older People’s Care” by Maria Andersson Marchesoni, Karin Axelsson, Ylva Fältholm, and Inger Lindberg
  • “Developing Organisational Ethics in Palliative Care” by Lars Sandman, Ulla Molander, and Inger Benkel
  • “Relationship Between Ethical Work Climate and Nurses’ Perception of Organizational Support, Commitment, Job Satisfaction and Turnover Intent” by Ebtsam Aly Abou Hashish
  • “The Quality of Obtaining Surgical Informed Consent” by Soodabeh Joolaee, Somayeh Faghanipour, and Fatemeh Hajibabaee
  • “Using Video in Childbirth Research” by J Davis Harte et al.
  • “Professional Values of Nurse Lecturers at Three Universities in Colombia” by Arabely López-Pereira and Gloria Arango-Bayer
  • “Moral Distress in Turkish Intensive Care Nurses” by Serife Karagozoglu, Gulay Yildirim, Dilek Ozden, and Ziynet Ç?nar
  • “Evaluation of School of Health Students’ Ethics Position in Turkey” by Emine ?en, Nursel Alp Dal, Ça?atay Üstün, and Alg?n Okursoy

 

A New Edition of JAMA Is Now Available

May 1, 2017

JAMA (vol. 317, no. 14, 2017) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “The Risk of Expanding the Uninsured Population by Repealing the Affordable Care Act” by Adam E. M. Eltorai amd Mahmoud I. Eltorai
  • “Achieving Universal Coverage Without Turning to a Single Payer: Lessons From 3 Other Countries” by Regina E. Herzlinger, Barak D. Richman, and Richard J. Boxer
  • “National Shortages of Generic Sterile Injectable Drugs: Norepinephrine as a Case Study of Potential Harm” by Julie M. Donohue and Derek C. Angus
  • “Potential Number of Organ Donors After Euthanasia in Belgium” by Jan Bollen, Tim van Smaalen, and Rankie ten Hoopen

 

China Is Racing Ahead of the US in the Quest to Cure Cancer with CRISPR

April 28, 2017

(Gizmodo) – On Friday, a team of Chinese scientists used the cutting-edge gene-editing technique CRISPR-Cas9 on humans for the second time in history, injecting a cancer patient with modified human genes in hopes of vanquishing the disease. In the US, the first planned trials to use CRISPR in people still have not gotten under way. But in China, things appear to be moving relatively quickly.

Because I Was Harmed

April 28, 2017

(NPR) – I wanted to break the sense of powerlessness that persists generation after generation. So part of my life’s work for the last decade has been advocating against FGM/C. No matter how many times I speak on the issue, I sense that most Americans are afraid to shatter their illusions of what FGM/C is and where it occurs. Often, it is misperceived as taking place only in small villages in Africa. People in general tend to distance the problem, othering it away, feeling safer in the belief that this form of violence doesn’t happen in the U.S.

Success in the 3-D Bioprinting of Cartilage

April 28, 2017

(Science Daily) – A team of researchers at Sahlgrenska Academy has managed to generate cartilage tissue by printing stem cells using a 3D-bioprinter. The fact that the stem cells survived being printed in this manner is a success in itself. In addition, the research team was able to influence the cells to multiply and differentiate to form chondrocytes (cartilage cells) in the printed structure.

Doctors Should Consider Whether Older Patients Can Hear Them

April 28, 2017

(Reuters) – Elderly people with hearing loss may have difficulty understanding speech in noisy healthcare settings – and the situation isn’t helped when doctors speak fast and use medical jargon, experts say.  But research on communication between doctors and patients has largely excluded older people with hearing problems. Not taking hearing loss into account means those earlier studies overlooked a common, important and fixable problem in communication, researchers write in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

US Yellow Fever Vaccine Supply Will Run Out This Summer, CDC Says

April 28, 2017

(CNN) – American supplies of yellow fever vaccine are expected to run out this summer, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday, and it released a report outlining a plan to ensure continuous access. Yellow fever, a potentially deadly viral hemorrhagic disease transmitted by infected mosquitoes, is endemic in tropical areas of 47 countries in Africa and Central and South America, according to the World Health Organization.

Artificial Intelligence Could One Day Help You Remember Everything

April 28, 2017

(Inc) – Humans are forgetful; we need calendar reminders, notepads, schedules, and assistants. But the co-creator of Siri, Apple’s digital assistant, says artificial intelligence technology could make forgetting an archaic problem of the past. Tom Gruber, the AI guru and Siri co-creator, believes that AI technology could help improve human’s shortcomings. During the TED 2017 conference on Tuesday, Gruber said it is inevitable that once artificial intelligence surpasses human intelligence, the technology will be used to enhance human cognition and memory.

Should We Study Human Embryos Beyond 14 Days?

April 27, 2017

(PBS) – Scientists describe the period that immediately follows as a black box. What little we do know is based on donated and preserved human embryos made available through institutions like the Carnegie Collection, started in the early 1900s, and the cultured embryos of animals–mice, chicks, the rare large mammal, and a few non-human primates. But humans are not frogs or mice or monkeys, and so to understand human development, we have to study humans. It’s no easy task. The newly implanted embryo is like a grain of sand embedded in a pillow locked in a box—impossible to observe. Unless that is, you can get an embryo to develop not in a uterus, but in a dish.

America’s Other Drug Problem

April 27, 2017

(ProPublica) – If you want to know why the nation’s health care costs are among the highest in the world, a good place to start is with what we throw away. Across the country, nursing homes routinely toss large quantities of perfectly good prescription medication: tablets for diabetes, syringes of blood thinners, pricey pills for psychosis and seizures. At a time when anger over soaring drug costs has perhaps never been more intense, redistributing discarded drugs seems like a no-brainer. Yet it’s estimated that American taxpayers, through Medicare, spend hundreds of millions of dollars each year on drugs for nursing home patients — much of which literally go down the tubes.

New Website Offers US Women Help to Perform Their Own Abortions

April 27, 2017

(The Guardian) – Research suggests that there is a small but significant number of US women who attempt to induce their own abortions without any medical supervision. Several studies have shown that many of these women, particularly those living along the US-Mexico border, are using misoprostol, a miscarriage-causing drug that can be legally purchased over the counter in many Central American pharmacies. In the US, it is illegal to administer the drug outside of certain medical clinics.

Does Mind-Hack Tech Mean Your Brain Needs Its Own Legal Rights?

April 27, 2017

(New Scientist) – Advances in neuroscience and neurotechnology offer the potential for extremely precise observation, collection and even alteration of human brain activity. Emerging cognitive tools, such as brain-computer interfaces and transcranial magnetic stimulation, could bring revolutionary advances in medicine and our understanding of behaviour. However, according to Swiss-based bioethicists Marcello Ienca and Roberto Andorno, these techniques also raise fundamental questions about human rights that need additional legal protection. Their concerns, published this week, are valid and appropriate, but we must be aware of the consequences of introducing such rights.

Cancer-Causing DNA Is Found in Some Stem Cells Being Used in Patients

April 27, 2017

(STAT News) – Some human stem cells growing in labs that researchers have used in experiments to treat serious diseases contain serious cancer-causing mutations, scientists reported on Wednesday. The discovery raised alarms that patients could be treated for one disease, such as macular degeneration, only to develop another, cancer. Harvard scientists obtained samples of most of the human embryonic stem cell lines registered with the National Institutes of Health for use in both basic research and in developing therapies for patients with diseases including diabetes, Parkinson’s, and macular degeneration. They found that five of the 140 lines had cells with a cancer-causing mutation.

‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Shows Exploited Surrogacy as Fiction, but It’s Happening in Our World Today

April 27, 2017

(Verily) – The Handmaid’s Tale premieres on Hulu today. It’s a book-based TV series, starring Elizabeth Moss, depicting a dystopian government where women are disenfranchised and used primarily just for their ability to reproduce. But what many fans of the story (and the new show) might not realize is that this reductionist and coercive treatment of women is not just a fictional plot line. Outside of Margaret Atwood’s story, the practice of gestational surrogacy is the harsh reality for many women across the globe.

Organ Trafficking ‘Booming’ in Lebanon as Desperate Syrians Sell Kidneys, Eyes: BBC

April 27, 2017

(Reuters) – Trade in illegal organs is a booming business in Lebanon as desperate Syrian refugees resort to selling body parts to support themselves and their families, according to an investigation by the BBC.  A trafficker who brokers deals from a coffee shop in Beirut, identified as Abu Jaafar, said while he knew his “booming” business was illegal, he saw it as helping people in need. He spoke to the BBC journalist Alex Forsyth from his base in a dilapidated building covered by a plastic tarpaulin in a southern Beirut suburb.

A Better Way to Care for the Dying

April 27, 2017

(The Economist) – Many deaths are preceded by a surge of treatment, often pointless. A survey of doctors in Japan found that 90% expected that patients with tubes inserted into their windpipes would never recover. Yet a fifth of patients who die in the country’s hospitals have been intubated. An eighth of Americans with terminal cancer receive chemotherapy in their final fortnight, despite it offering no benefit at such a late stage. Nearly a third of elderly Americans undergo surgery during their final year; 8% do so in their last week.

How to Have a Better Death

April 27, 2017

(The Economist) – This newspaper has called for the legalisation of doctor-assisted dying, so that mentally fit, terminally ill patients can be helped to end their lives if that is their wish. But the right to die is just one part of better care at the end of life. The evidence suggests that most people want this option, but that few would, in the end, choose to exercise it. To give people the death they say they want, medicine should take some simple steps. More palliative care is needed. This neglected branch of medicine deals with the relief of pain and other symptoms, such as breathlessness, as well as counselling for the terminally ill.

A New Edition of Genetics in Medicine Is Now Available

April 27, 2017

Genetics in Medicine (vol. 19, no. 4, 2017) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Successful Outcomes of Older Adolescents and Adults with Profound Biotinidase Deficiency Identified by Newborn Screening” by Barry Wolf
  • “A Secondary Benefit: The Reproductive Impact of Carrier Results from Newborn Screening for Cystic Fibrosis” by Yvonne Bombard et al.
  • “Estimation of the Number of People with Down Syndrome in the United States” by Gert de Graaf, Frank Buckley, and Brian G. Skotko
  • “Streamlined Genetic Education Is Effective in Preparing Women Newly Diagnosed with Breast Cancer for Decision Making About Treatment-Focused Genetic Testing: A Randomized Controlled Noninferiority Trial” by Veronica F. Quinn et al.

 

A New Edition of NanoEthics Is Now Available

April 27, 2017

NanoEthics (vol. 11, no. 1, 2017) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Changing Me Softly: Making Sense of Soft Regulation and Compliance in the Italian Nanotechnology Sector” by Simone Arnaldi
  • “Visioneering Socio-Technical Innovations — a Missing Piece of the Puzzle” by Martin Sand and Christoph Schneider
  • “The Logic of Digital Utopianism” by Sascha Dickel and Jan-Felix Schrape
  • “One Site—Multiple Visions: Visioneering Between Contrasting Actors’ Perspectives” by Franziska Engels, Anna Verena Münch and Dagmar Simon
  • “How Smart Grid Meets In Vitro Meat: on Visions as Socio-Epistemic Practices” by Arianna Ferrari and Andreas Lösch
  • “Into Blue Skies—a Transdisciplinary Foresight and Co-creation Method for Adding Robustness to Visioneering” by Niklas Gudowsky and Mahshid Sotoudeh

 

A New Edition of Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics Is Now Available

April 27, 2017

Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics (vol. 38, no. 2, 2017) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Hearing Sub-Saharan African Voices in Bioethics” by Kevin Gary Behrens
  • “Giving Voice to African Thought in Medical Research Ethics” by Godfrey B. Tangwa
  • “Ancillary Care Obligations in Light of an African Bioethic: From Entrustment to Communion” by Thaddeus Metz
  • “Partiality and Distributive Justice in African Bioethics” by Christopher Simon Wareham
  • “Chronicles of Communication and Power: Informed Consent to Sterilisation in the Namibian Supreme Court’s LM Judgment of 2015″ by Nyasha Chingore-Munazvo, Katherine Furman, Annabel Raw, and Mariette Slabbert
  • “Dealing with the Other Between the Ethical and the Moral: Albinism on the African Continent” by Elvis Imafidon

 

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