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Nursing Is Seen as the Most Ethical Profession in America and Congress Ranks the Least

December 23, 2016

(Health IT News) – Nurses rank, by far, the top profession for honest and ethics in the U.S. in the 2016 version of the annual Gallup poll on ethics in professions, Americans Rate Healthcare Providers High on Honest, Ethics, published this week. Since 1999, nurses have been #1 in this survey except for the year 2001, when firefighters scored the top spot in light of the 9/11 attack. Another consistency in this survey among U.S. consumers is that pharmacists and physicians top the list once again, after nurses, and the most-trusted professions in America.

A New Edition of The New England Journal of Medicine Is Now Available

December 23, 2016

The New England Journal of Medicine (vol. 375, no. 22, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Clarifying Stem-Cell Therapy’s Benefits and Risks” by P.W. Marks, C.M. Witten, and R.M. Califf
  • “Use of a Vaginal Ring Containing Dapivirine for HIV-1 Prevention in Women” by J.M. Baeten et al.
  • “Safety and Efficacy of a Dapivirine Vaginal Ring for HIV Prevention in Women” by A. Nel et al.

 

A New Edition of Minds and Machines Is Now Available

December 23, 2016

Minds and Machines (vol. 26, no. 4, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “On the Risks of Relying on Analogies to Understand Cyber Conflicts” by Mariarosaria Taddeo
  • “The Internet, Cognitive Enhancement, and the Values of Cognition” by Richard Heersmink
  • “Dynamics of Perceptible Agency: The Case of Social Robots” by Maria Brincker

 

A New Edition of Genetics in Medicine Is Now Available

December 23, 2016

Genetics in Medicine (vol. 18, no. 12, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Which BRCA Genetic Testing Programs Are Ready for Implementation in Health Care? A Systematic Review of Economic Evaluations” by Elvira D’Andrea, Carolina Marzuillo, Corrado De Vito, Marco Di Marco, Erica Pitini, Maria Rosaria Vacchio, and Paolo Villari
  • “Designing Babies Through Gene Editing: Science or Science Fiction?” by A. Cecile J.W. Janssens
  • “What Are People Willing to Pay for Whole-Genome Sequencing Information, and Who Decides What They Receive?” by Deborah A. Marshall, Juan Marcos Gonzalez, F. Reed Johnson, Karen V. MacDonald, Amy Pugh, Michael P. Douglas, and Kathryn A. Phillips

 

Fatal French Clinical Trail Failed to Check Data Before Raising Drug Dose

December 22, 2016

(Nature) – Criticism of the drug company at the centre of a disastrous clinical trial that left one participant dead and four with long-term neurological symptoms has intensified following a revelation that the firm did not use certain data when deciding to administer a higher dose that proved deadly. On 15 December, during a conference presentation by a scientist from the Portuguese company, Bial, it emerged that the firm did not use certain readings, called pharmacodynamic (PD) data, on how the drug BIA 10-2474 was acting in participants who had received a lower dose, before taking the decision to increase the dosage.

Golfing, ‘Girls Night Out’ Where Pharma Employees Allegedly Fixed Prices

December 22, 2016

(STAT News) – The high prices Americans pay for generic drugs may have been cooked up by pharmaceutical salespeople on golf courses, at a New Jersey steakhouse, or over martinis at a “girls night out” in Minnesota. Details emerging from an ongoing investigation show that drug company employees gathered regularly at such swanky locations and conspired to keep prices and profits high, according to interviews and a complaint filed last week in US District Court by Attorneys General in 20 states.

Living Kidney Donors Often Pay Their Own Expenses

December 22, 2016

(Reuters) – Most living kidney donors pay at least some of the expenses related to donation themselves, which may limit how many people can afford to provide organs to transplant recipients, a U.S. study suggests. Researchers examined survey data from 796 living kidney donors on how much they spent for out-of-pocket medical costs as well as indirect expenses such as lost income or travel bills associated with donation. Overall, 78 percent of the donors shouldered some costs themselves, and 21 percent of them reported more than $500 in out-of-pocket medical bills and other expenses, the study found.

CDC Allocates $184 Million for Zika Protection

December 22, 2016

(UPI) – Nearly $184 million has been earmarked to protect Americans against Zika virus infection, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Thursday. The funding will go to states, territories, local governments and universities. It’s part of $350 million awarded to the CDC by Congress earlier in 2016 for Zika response and preparedness, the agency said.

Aging and Addicted: The Opioid Epidemic Affects Older Adults, Too

December 22, 2016

(Kaiser Health News) – As the nation grapples with a devastating opioid epidemic, concerns have primarily focused on young people buying drugs on the street. But America’s elderly also have a problem. Over the past several decades, physicians have increasingly prescribed seniors pain medications to address chronic pain from arthritis, cancer, neurological diseases and other illnesses that become more common in later life.

First US Babies Treated in Study of Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Congenital Heart Disease

December 22, 2016

(Medical Xpress) – In a first-in-children randomized clinical study, medical researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM) and the Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute (ISCI) at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have begun testing to see whether adult stem cells derived from bone marrow benefit children with the congenital heart defect hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). UM SOM surgeons are injecting the cells into the babies’ hearts during open-heart operations at the University of Maryland Medical Center. ISCI is supplying the stem cells for the procedures.

Gene Therapy Offers Hope for “Worst Disease You’ve Never Heard Of”

December 22, 2016

(MIT Technology Review) – Epidermolysis bullosa has been called “the worst disease you’ve never heard of.” Its victims must bandage themselves and suffer unrelenting pain. In the Netherlands, which allows euthanasia, two children have been killed to stop their suffering. Gene therapy offers a possible new way to treat the condition, which in Roeder’s case is due to a DNA mutation that prevents her body from producing type-7 collagen, the material that anchors the upper and lower layers of the skin together.

A New Edition of Medico-Legal Journal Is Now Available

December 22, 2016

Medico-Legal Journal (vol. 84, no. 4, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Do Not Resuscitate: Lawful or Unlawful?” by Alec Samuels
  • “The State of Ethical-Legal Oaths in UK Medical Practice Today: Is It Time to Look at Standardising?” by RL Atenstaedt

 

A New Edition of Christian Journal for Global Health Is Now Available

December 22, 2016

Christian Journal for Global Health (vol. 3, no. 2, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Evaluation of Community Health Worker Training Course Effectiveness in India” by Nicole Butcher, Adeline Sitther, Jachin Velavan, Elizabeth John, Mary
    Chandra Thomas, and Nathan Grills
  • “A Qualitative Study on Provider Perspectives on the Barriers to Contraceptive Use in Kaliro and Iganga Districts, Eastern Central Uganda” by Constance Sibongile Shumba, Jonathan Miyonga, Judith Kiconco, Patrick Kerchan, and Tonny Tumwesigye
  • “A Realist Evaluation of the Formation of Groups of People With Disabilities in Northern India” by Rebekah Young, Matthew Reeve, Alex Devine, Lawrence Singh, and Nathan Grills
  • “Maternal and Child Health From a Human Rights Perspective: The Indian Scenario and Nuns as Community Health Enablers” by Dr. Tomi Thomas, Dr. Anto Maliekal

 

A New Edition of HEC Forum Is Now Available

December 22, 2016

HEC Forum (vol. 28, no. 4, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Models of Ethics Consultation Used by Canadian Ethics Consultants: A Qualitative Study” by Chris Kaposy, Fern Brunger, Victor Maddalena, and Richard Singleton
  • “A Qualitative Exploration of a Clinical Ethicist’s Role and Contributions During Family Meetings” by Courtenay R. Bruce, Trevor M. Bibler, Adam M. Pena, and Betsy Kusin
  • “Just a Collection of Recollections: Clinical Ethics Consultation and the Interplay of Evaluating Voices” by Virginia L. Bartlett, Mark J. Bliton, and Stuart G. Finder
  • “Managing Ethical Difficulties in Healthcare: Communicating in Inter-Professional Clinical Ethics Support Sessions” by Catarina Fischer Grönlund, Vera Dahlqvist, Karin Zingmark, Mikael Sandlund, and Anna Söderberg
  • “Failure of the Current Advance Care Planning Paradigm: Advocating for a Communications-Based Approach” by Laura Vearrier
  • “Still Human: A Call for Increased Focus on Ethical Standards in Cadaver Research” by Michelle C. Bach

 

A New Edition of Medicine, Health Care, and Philosophy Is Now Available

December 22, 2016

Medicine, Health Care, and Philosophy (vol. 19, no. 4, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “The Separation Wall and the Right to Healthcare” by Melania Borgo and Mario Picozzi
  • “Rethinking the Ethical Approach to Health Information Management Through Narration: Pertinence of Ricœur’s ‘Little Ethics’” by Corine Mouton Dorey
  • “The Near-Failure of Advance Directives: Why They Should Not Be Abandoned Altogether, But Their Role Radically Reconsidered” by Marta Spranzi and Véronique Fournier
  • “Uncertainty and Objectivity in Clinical Decision Making: A Clinical Case in Emergency Medicine” by Eivind Engebretsen, Kristin Heggen, Sietse Wieringa, and Trisha Greenhalgh
  • “Psychoanalysis and Bioethics: A Lacanian Approach to Bioethical Discourse” by Hub Zwart
  • “Organ Donation After Assisted Death: Is It More or Less Ethically-Problematic Than Donation After Circulatory Death?” by Jeffrey Kirby

 

A New Edition of Ethical Theory and Moral Practice Is Now Available

December 22, 2016

Ethical Theory and Moral Practice (vol. 19, no. 5, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Disabled – Therefore, Unhealthy?” by Sean Aas

Columbia Cuts Price of Novartis Cancer Drug by 44 Percent

December 21, 2016

(Reuters) – Colombia’s government has lowered the price of Novartis cancer drug imatinib by nearly half in a bid to cut healthcare costs after failed price negotiations with the Swiss company. Novartis will be legally obliged to sell the drug, which is used to treat leukemia and other cancers, at the new price. The new cost per milligram is 44 percent less than the original price, the Colombian Health Ministry said in a statement late on Tuesday.

Demand Surges for Clinicians Serving Transgender Youth–And for Earlier Treatment

December 21, 2016

(Scientific American) – Thanks to the openness of Caitlyn Jenner and others, public awareness of transgenderism — and demand for trans-specific medical care like counseling, hormone treatments, and genital surgery — is exploding, even for the youngest of patients. At the 30-plus clinics for transgender youth across the US, doctors like Olson-Kennedy can barely keep up with the demand.

A Cure for Social Anxiety Disorders

December 21, 2016

(Science Daily) – Social phobia is the most common anxiety disorder of our time. But the current treatment regimen for patients with this diagnosis has not proven very effective. Now a team of Norwegian and British researchers believe they have found a cure for social anxiety disorders. “We’ve set a new world record in effectively treating social anxiety disorders,” says Hans M. Nordahl, a professor of behavioural medicine at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU).

Routine Drug Screening Should Be Done in Primary Care Settings: Study

December 21, 2016

(UPI) – A new study by UCLA is calling for routine drug testing in primary care settings in areas where misuse of drugs is prevalent. Researchers found that 19.4 percent of people answering a computerized self-administered survey in community clinics in East Los Angeles admitted to moderate-to-high drug use. In Tijuana, Mexico, that number was 5.7 percent. Both findings were considerably higher than the results from household surveys reported.

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