Bioethics.com

Subscribe to Bioethics.com feed
Your global information source on bioethics news and issues
Updated: 1 hour 47 min ago

A New Edition of International Journal for Quality in Healthcare Is Now Available

November 1, 2016

International Journal for Quality in Healthcare (Vol. 28, Suppl 1, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “What Are Junior Medical Doctors in Ethiopia Actually Doing: Using Evidence Generated from Task Analysis Study to Strengthen Medical Practice, Education and Regulation” by D. Dejene, T. Yigzaw, S. Megistu, and A. Hiruy
  • “Forethought on the End of Life: Using Simulation to Improve Communication Skills with End-of-Life Patients and Their Families in Hospitals of Clalit Health Services” by H. Perry-Mezare, R. Yahalom, M. Leonenko, and M. Brezis

 

A New Edition of The New England Journal of Medicine Is Now Available

November 1, 2016

The New England Journal of Medicine (vol. 375, no. 15, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Medicaid and Insuring the Poor—Where Are We Heading?” by S. Rosenbaum
  • “Hard Time or Hospital Treatment? Mental Illness and the Criminal Justice System” by C. Montross

 

A New Edition of Science, Technology & Human Values Is Now Available

November 1, 2016

Science, Technology & Human Values (Volume 41, No. 6, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Informed Refusal: Toward a Justice-based Bioethics” by Ruha Benjamin
  • “A Postapartheid Genome: Genetic Ancestry Testing and Belonging in South Africa” by Laura A. Foster

 

Regenerating Muscle from Stem Cells

October 31, 2016

(Medical Xpress) – A microscopic image of a mouse leg that has been reconstructed with a stem cell transplant shows what may one day help patients regrow new muscle after a major surgery. The image shows cross-sectioned muscle fibers as black shapes outlined in green. The catch: these are human muscle fibers, grown from human stem cells.

Genetic Testing Fumbles, Revealing ‘Dark Side’ of Precision Medicine

October 31, 2016

(STAT News) – Enthusiasm for precision medicine, from the White House down to everyday physicians, is at an all-time high. But serious problems with the databases used to interpret patients’ genetic profiles can lead to “inappropriate treatment” with “devastating consequences,” researchers at the Mayo Clinic warned on Monday. Their report describes the cases of some two dozen people who were told they had a potentially fatal illness and one who had a heart defibrillator surgically implanted but, it turns out, never needed it. The individuals were family members who underwent genetic testing after a young relative died of a heart syndrome.

Bioethicists Challenge Doctors’ Right to Refuse Care

October 31, 2016

(Eurekalert) – In a recent article, the Editors-in-Chief of two leading ethics journals stress that there should be better protections for patients from doctors’ personal values as well as more severe restrictions on the right of clinicians to conscientious objection, particularly in relation to assisted dying.

Federal Judge Blocks Two Abortion Laws in Alabama

October 31, 2016

(Reuters) – A U.S. federal judge on Thursday blocked abortion restrictions in Alabama that limit how close clinics can be to public schools and ban a procedure used to terminate pregnancies in the second trimester. Judge Myron Thompson in the District Court for the Middle District of Alabama issued a preliminary injunction, ruling that the laws are likely to be found unconstitutional, according to online court records. The school-proximity law bans clinics within 2,000 feet of a K-8 public school.

FDA Issues Guidelines for Female Libido Pills after Learning Some Hard Lessons

October 31, 2016

(STAT News) – After a two-year wait, the US Food and Drug Administration finally issued new guidance for companies that want to develop drugs to bolster female libidos. But the details suggest the agency has belatedly learned some hard-fought lessons following complaints that the controversial Addyi pill did not warrant approval last year. The 15-page draft guidance, which was released Tuesday, offers a typical how-to for companies, but also points to certain steps that Sprout Pharmaceuticals did not follow as part of its Addyi marketing application to the FDA.

Yazidi Women Survivors of ‘Islamic State’ Win EU’s Sakharov Human Rights Prize

October 31, 2016

(Deutsche Welle) – Iraqis Nadia Murad(pictured above, left) and Lamiya Aji Bashar (pictured above, right), who hail from a Yazidi village in Iraq that was overrun by the self-styled “Islamic State” (IS) in 2014, were named Thursday as recipients of the Sakharov Prize. They were nominated by European parliamentary deputies from multiple parties. The laureates’ names were announced at about midday by European Parliament President Martin Schulz, and an award ceremony is slated for December 14.

A New Edition of JAMA Is Now Available

October 31, 2016

JAMA (vol. 316, no. 11, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Ensuring Respect for Human Research Participants: Institutional Review Boards and Sharing Results From Research” by Samuel N. Doernberg and David Wendler
  • “Need for a National Evaluation System for Health Technology” by Jeffrey Shuren and Robert M. Califf

 

A New Edition of The New England Journal of Medicine Is Now Available

October 31, 2016

The New England Journal of Medicine (vol. 375, no. 12, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Considerations for Developing a Zika Virus Vaccine” by H.D. Marston, N. Lurie, L.L. Borio, and A.S. Fauci
  • “Fast-Track Zika Vaccine Development — Is It Possible?” by S.J. Thomas, M. L’Azou, A.D.T. Barrett, and N.A.C. Jackson

A New Edition of Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics Is Now Available

October 31, 2016

Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics (vol. 37, no. 5, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Making Good Choices: Toward a Theory of Well-Being in Medicine” by Alicia Hall
  • “Personalized Medicine: Evidence of Normativity in its Quantitative Definition of Health” by Henrik Vogt, Bjørn Hofmann, and Linn Getz
  • “The Casuistic Method of Practical Ethics” by Georg Spielthenner

 

A New Edition of International Journal for Quality in Healthcare Is Now Available

October 31, 2016

International Journal for Quality in Healthcare (Vol. 28, No. 4, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Non-Beneficial Treatments in Hospital at the End of Life: A Systematic Review on Extent of the Problem” by M Cardona-Morrell, JCH Kim, RM Turner, M Anstey, IA Mitchell, and K Hillman

 

A New Edition of Hastings Center Report Is Now Available

October 31, 2016

Hastings Center Report (vol. 46, no. 5, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “From “Personalized” to “Precision” Medicine: The Ethical and Social Implications of Rhetorical Reform in Genomic Medicine” by Eric Juengst, Michelle L. McGowan, Jennifer R. Fishman, and Richard A. Settersten Jr.
  • “A Conceptual Model for the Translation of Bioethics Research and Scholarship” by Debra J.H. Mathews, D. Micah Hester, Jeffrey Kahn, Amy McGuire, Ross McKinney Jr., Keith Meador, Sean Philpott-Jones, Stuart Youngner and Benjamin S. Wilfond

 

A New Edition of JAMA Is Now Available

October 30, 2016

JAMA (vol. 316, no. 14, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Hospital-Affiliated Outpatient Birth Centers: A Possible Model for Helping to Achieve the Triple Aim in Obstetrics” by Victoria G. Woo, Arnold Milstein, and Terry Platchek
  • “Zika Virus 6 Months Later” by Thomas R. Frieden, Anne Schuchat, and Lyle R. Petersen
  • “Cost, Effectiveness, and Value: How to Judge? by Michael D. Rawlins

Is a Placebo a Sham If You Know It’s a Fake And It Still Works?

October 28, 2016

(NPR) – So placebos have pretty much been tossed in the “garbage pail” of clinical practice, says Ted Kaptchuk, director of the Program for Placebo Studies and the Therapeutic Encounter at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. In an attempt to make them more useful, he has been studying whether people might see a benefit from a placebo even if they knew it was a placebo, with no active ingredients. An earlier study found that so-called “open-label” or “honest” placebos improved symptoms among people with irritable bowel syndrome. And Kaptchuk and his colleagues found the same effect among people with garden-variety lower back pain, the most common kind of pain reported by American adults.

UK National Sperm Bank Stops Recruiting Donors

October 28, 2016

(The Guardian) – Britain’s first national sperm bank has stopped recruiting new donors only two years after it opened, amid reports that it had successfully signed up only seven men during that time. The National Sperm Bank (NSB) has been struggling to meet the costs of continuing to recruit, having started up with a £77,000 government grant in October 2014.

Scientists Tackle Lethal Childhood Brain Cancer

October 28, 2016

(Scientific American) – Since 2009 researchers at Dana–Farber have sequenced brain tumors in nearly 1,000 children. Among kids with tumors classified as a low-grade glioma, up to 10 percent have a mutation in a gene called BRAF that is seen in some adult skin tumors. A few years ago, 32 children from Europe and North America with BRAF-positive gliomas entered a clinical trial of dabrafenib, a targeted therapy approved for melanoma patients with this mutation. At a conference in Copenhagen earlier this month, Kieran reported that 23 of the 32 kids improved on the BRAF-inhibiting drug—a response rate high enough that his team is offering continued therapy to trial participants with the mutation.

Yemen’s Suspected Cholera Cases Soar to 1,410 within Weeks: WHO

October 28, 2016

(Reuters) – The number of suspected cholera cases in Yemen has ballooned to 1,410 within three weeks of the outbreak being declared, the World Health Organization said on Friday, as 18 months of war has destroyed most health facilities and clean water supplies. Yemen’s Health Ministry announced the outbreak on Oct. 6 in Sanaa city, and by Oct. 10 the WHO said there were 24 suspected cases. The following day, a WHO official in Yemen said there was “no spread of the disease”.

Gammy’s Australian Parents Escape Charges for Lying under Oath

October 28, 2016

(Daily Mail) – The couple accused of abandoning baby Gammy in Thailand because he has Down syndrome have escaped perjury charges for lying under oath. Wendy and David Farnell caused outrage in 2014 when they left Gammy with surrogate mother Pattaroamoun Chanbua, 22, but took his healthy sister. The Bunbury, Perth, couple had lied under oath about the genetic makeup of Gammy and his twin Pipah. But the Farnells have escaped conviction after the Director of Public Prosecutions said it was not in the public interest to pursue charges, WA Today reported.

Pages