Bioethics.com

Subscribe to Bioethics.com feed
Your global information source on bioethics news, issues, & events
Updated: 3 hours 23 min ago

The Opportunity ‘Is Huge’: Why Tech Developers Are Trying to Tackle Mental Health

July 20, 2018

(STAT News) – Here in the technology epicenter of the world, developers are increasingly writing code and launching products to try to disrupt yet another field: mental health. Even as big tech players have conquered the markets in industries like transportation and lodging, they’ve largely steered clear of mental health treatment. Now, however, with an influx of funding, companies are revamping pills with digital sensors, designing virtual reality worlds to treat addiction and other conditions, and building chatbots for interactive therapy.

10-Year-Old Somali Girl Dies Female Genital Mutilation

July 20, 2018

(ABC News) – A 10-year-old girl has bled to death after undergoing female genital mutilation in Somalia, an activist said, a rare confirmed death in the country with the world’s highest rate of the practice. The girl died in a hospital on Monday, two days after her mother took her to a traditional circumciser in a remote village outside Dhusamareb town in central Galmudug state, Hawa Aden Mohamed with the Galkayo Education Center for Peace and Development said in a statement.

Immigrant Shelters Drug Traumatized Teenagers Without Consent

July 20, 2018

(ProPublica) – Initially, staff described her as receptive and resilient. But as she was shuttled from one Texas shelter to another, she became increasingly depressed. Without consulting her grandfather, or her mother in El Salvador, shelter staff have prescribed numerous medications for her, including two psychotropic drugs whose labels warn of increased suicidal behavior in adolescents, according to court documents. Still languishing in a shelter after 18 months, the 17-year-old doesn’t want to take the medications, but she does anyway, because staff at one facility told her she wouldn’t be released until she is considered psychologically sound.

Long Waits to See Doctors in Puerto Rico Where Medical Needs Are Great Post-Maria

July 20, 2018

(Kaiser Health News) – Physicians are in short supply in Puerto Rico. From 2006 to 2016, the number of doctors on the island declined from 14,000 to 9,000, according the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Puerto Rico. And Hurricane Maria has helped fuel the exodus. Dr. José Cruz, a pediatrician with a practice in Ponce, said the island’s ongoing financial crisis and low payments from health insurers drove many physicians to seek work in the States.

Doctors Could Prescribe Drugs More Accurately–if They Could Get the Data

July 20, 2018

(STAT News) – Amazon tells us every day which books would interest us, and Google can chart the fastest routes to our destinations, because these companies have mountains of data on which to base their predictions. We could provide better care for our patients if we had information that would allow us to target treatments to individual patients. But we don’t. Doctors and researchers need clinical trial data to make this happen — and that is hard to come by.

Indigenous People ‘Attuned’ to Chronic Disease Risk

July 20, 2018

(SciDevNet) – Indigenous communities in northern Ecuador are concerned about rising rates of cancer in their ethnic group and “attuned” to the global phenomena behind the disease, researchers have found. A study carried out in two Kichwa communities located in the province of Imbabura, in the north of the country, found that villagers believe cancer rates are rising due to the use of chemical products, pollution, urbanization, lifestyle changes, as well as the increase of westernized diets and erosion of their culture.

Study Claiming Abortions Are ‘Reversible’ Retracted, Not Based on Science

July 20, 2018

(Newsweek) – A scientific journal withdrew a study that claimed women could halt the effects of an abortion pill after it failed to receive ethical approval. The study, initially published in April in the journal Issues in Law and Medicine, found that almost half of women who received a high dose of the hormone progesterone were able to successfully “reverse” the effects of mifepristone, one of two pills used to medically induce abortion. The study’s author, George Delgado, first presented his findings in a series of anecdotal journal entries in 2012 that prompted several conservative-leaning states to adopt legislation requiring doctors to inform women seeking abortions that the procedure can be halted.

Experts Say Recent ‘Alien’ Mummy Study Was Deeply Flawed and Unethical

July 20, 2018

(Gizmodo) – Earlier this year, scientists from Stanford University concluded that a strange skeleton known as the Atacama Mummy belonged to a human girl whose physical malformations were the result of several severe genetic mutations. A team of international experts is now questioning these findings, and accusing the scientists of breaching standard research ethics.

Why Are UK Teen Pregnancy Rates Dropping?

July 20, 2018

(Medscape) – In the last decade the number of teenage pregnancies in England and Wales has fallen by 55% to a record low. According to the latest statistics (from 2016) the under-18 conception rate was down to 18.9 conceptions per thousand women aged 15 to 17. In 1969 the under-18 conception rate was 47.1. The British Pregnancy Advisory Service, bpas, said Scotland and Northern Ireland have also seen significant declines in teenage pregnancies.

A New Edition of Nursing Philosophy Is Now Available

July 20, 2018

Nursing Philosophy (vol. 19, no. 3, 2018) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Heeding Humanity in an Age of Electronic Health Records: Heidegger, Levinas, and Healthcare” by Casey Rentmeester
  • “Nursing Knowledge: A Middle Ground Exploration” by Mariko Liette Sakamoto
  • “Meaning, Lived Experience, Empathy and Boredom: Max van Manen on Phenomenology and Heidegger” by John Paley
  • “Phenomenology and Qualitative Research: Amedeo Giorgi’s Hermetic Epistemology” by John Paley

 

A New Edition of Journal of Legal Medicine Is Now Available

July 20, 2018

Journal of Legal Medicine (vol. 37, supple. 1, 2018) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Ethical Dilemmas in the Postmodern Condition: When Patients and Their Physicians Confront the Controversy of Medical Treatment with Schedule II Controlled Substances” by Michael G. Anderson
  • “The Future of Legal Medicine: Trauma Care, Medical Innovation, and Much Beyond” by Sai Balasubramanian

 

A New Edition of Nature Biotechnology Is Now Available

July 20, 2018

Nature Biotechnology (vol. 36, no. 6, 2018) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “DIYbio Gets a Poxy Rap”
  • “Human Embryo Rresearch Policy Update”

 

A New Edition of Genetics in Medicine Is Now Available

July 20, 2018

Genetics in Medicine (vol. 20, no. 6, 2018) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Considerations in Healthcare Reform for Patients and Families with Genetic Diseases: A Statement of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics”
  • “From Public Health Genomics to Precision Public Health: A 20-Year Journey” by Muin J Khoury et al.

 

A Spike in Liver Disease Deaths Among Young Adults Fueled by Alcohol

July 19, 2018

(NPR) – The analysis revealed that deaths from liver-related illnesses have increased dramatically, and mortality in young people rose the fastest. Although these illnesses can be caused by several things including obesity and hepatitis C infection, the rise among young Americans was caused by alcohol consumption. The number of 25- to 34-year-olds who died annually from alcohol-related liver disease nearly tripled between 1999 and 2016, from 259 in 1999 to 767 in 2016, an average annual increase of around 10 percent.

Having 5 or More Babies May Increase Alzheimer’s Risk by 70%, Study Finds

July 19, 2018

(CNN) – Women who have given birth five or more times may be 70% more likely to develop Alzheimer’s later in life than those who have fewer births, according to a new study of more than 3,500 women in South Korea and Greece. Even women without dementia who had given birth five or more times scored lower on a commonly used cognitive test than those with fewer children. The study looked only at women older than 60; the average age of the women tested in both countries was 71.

Arizona Law Would Give Frozen Embryos to Spouse Who Wants Baby After Divorce

July 19, 2018

(CBS News) – A controversial new Arizona law that took effect July 1 would give Torres access to the embryos. The law requires courts to give embryos to the spouse who plans to use them to have a baby when a couple decides to have a divorce.  Supporters of the law say it will protect a partner’s right to his or her embryos. Opponents say it could force people to become parents against their will. Claudia Work represents Torres’ ex-husband John Terrell. She says the law could have devastating consequences for people like her client.

Nigeria Has a High Fertility Rate. Why Are Infertility Clinics Booming?

July 19, 2018

(The Economist) – The fertility rate in Nigeria is estimated to be 5.4, implying that the average woman can expect to have that many children during her life. Yet many Nigerians experience infertility. Chelsea Polis of the Guttmacher Institute, a think-tank, and her colleagues estimate that 31% of Nigerian couples fail to conceive a child after 12 months of unprotected sex—a rate at least as high as in the West.

Geography Is Big Variable in Cancer Care

July 19, 2018

(MedPage Today) – The cost of care during the last month of a cancer patient’s life varied by as much as 90% depending on where the patient lived, an analysis of more than 1,000 cases showed. Average expenditures during the last month of life ranged from about $10,000 in some areas to more than $19,000 in others. Investigators found that the wide variation in end-of-life expenditures was not associated with patient or family preferences but instead with treating physicians’ attitudes, beliefs, and knowledge about end-of-life care, as reported in Health Affairs.

End-of-Life Care in the US Steadily Improving

July 19, 2018

(Medscape) – The quality of care at the end of life has improved in the United States since 2000, with fewer deaths occurring in acute care hospitals and more occurring at home or in hospice, according to a new study. Fewer end-of-life patients are being transferred to hospitals for “burdensome care” for things like dehydration and infections, the study found, and use of the intensive care unit (ICU) in the last month of life, which had increased until 2009, has stabilized.

Organ Donation: We Can Break Taboos Among British BAME Communities

July 19, 2018

(The Guardian) – De La Mode is one of hundreds of patients from the UK’s black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) communities who are forced to wait longer than the majority of white patients due to a paucity of suitable organs from the same ethnic and racial pool. A new report from NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT) reveals that 21% of people who died on the waiting list last year were from a BAME background, compared with 15% a decade ago. The percentage of donors from BAME backgrounds did increase last year, but is still at just 7%.

Pages