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A New Edition of American Journal of Law & Medicine Is Now Available

August 5, 2016

American Journal of Law & Medicine (vol. 42, no. 2-3, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “The Perils of Panic: Ebola, HIV, and the Intersection of Global Health and Law” by Michael S. Sinha and Wendy E. Parmet
  • “Law and Politics, an Emerging Epidemic: A Call for Evidence-Based Public Health Law” by Michael R. Ulrich
  • “Beyond Lifestyle: Governing the Social Determinants of Health” by Wendy K. Mariner
  • “Vaccines and Airline Travel: A Federal Role to Protect the Public Health” by Christopher T. Robertson
  • “Is There a Moral Right to Nonmedical Vaccine Exemption?” by Isha Ann Emhoff, Ellen Fugate, and Nir Eyal

 

A New Edition of BMC Medical Ethics Is Now Available

August 5, 2016

BMC Medical Ethics (vol. 17, July 2016) is available online.

Articles include:

  • “Dying Well With Reduced Agency: A Scoping Review and Thematic Synthesis of the Decision-Making Process in Dementia, Traumatic Brain Injury and Frailty” by G. Birchley, K. Jones, R. Huxtable, J. Dixon, J. Kitzinger, and L. Clare
  • “Same Same But Different: Why We Should Care About the Distinction Between Professionalism and Ethics” by S. Salloch
  • “Bioethics Education in Clinical Settings: Theory and Practice of the Dilemma Method of Moral Case Deliberation” by M. Stolper, B. Molewijk, and G. Widdershoven

 

Sperm Banks Accused of Losing Samples and Lying About Donors

August 4, 2016

(New York Times) – Frozen sperm has become a major industry, dominated by a few large sperm banks, but with smaller stocks of sperm maintained at hundreds of assisted-reproduction centers nationwide. The Food and Drug Administration requires that donor sperm be tested for infectious diseases. Beyond that, sperm banks are lightly regulated. Several states require health department licensing of the labs, but only New York conducts routine inspections. Some of the new cases accuse sperm banks of careless record-keeping, or mishandling or misappropriation of sperm banked for a client’s personal use. Others say the banks use hyped, misleading descriptions to market their donors.

Deadly Medical Errors Are Less Common Than Headlines Suggest

August 4, 2016

(The Conversation) – A report published in May from researchers at Johns Hopkins claims that medical errors are the third leading cause of death in the U.S., behind only heart disease and cancer. According to the researchers, medical errors account for 251,454 U.S. deaths each year – and they regard this figure as an underestimate. That’s the sort of finding that makes headlines. Indeed, you might have read about this report in the newspaper or even seen it reported on the evening news. But as we’ll argue, the methods the researchers used to draw this conclusion are flawed, and that means that the conclusion that medical error is the third leading cause of death is highly questionable.

Naturally Occurring High Testosterone Shouldn’t Keep Female Athletes Out of Competition

August 4, 2016

(Scientific American) – Four years ago Indian sprinter Dutee Chand seemed headed for greatness. She became her country’s 100-meter champion for women 18 and younger, and the Sports Authority of India called her a “sure shot Olympic medalist.” Yet soon afterward, the Athletics Federation of India banned her from competition because she had an elevated level of the hormone testosterone, the result of a natural condition called hyperandrogenism.

You’ve Got Nerve

August 4, 2016

(The Economist) – The general idea of building computers to resemble brains is called neuromorphic computing, a term coined by Carver Mead, a pioneering computer scientist, in the late 1980s. There are many attractions. Brains may be slow and error-prone, but they are also robust, adaptable and frugal. They excel at processing the sort of noisy, uncertain data that are common in the real world but which tend to give conventional electronic computers, with their prescriptive arithmetical approach, indigestion. The latest development in this area came on August 3rd, when a group of researchers led by Evangelos Eleftheriou at IBM’s research laboratory in Zurich announced, in a paper published in Nature Nanotechnology, that they had built a working, artificial version of a neuron.

Half of All Pediatric Clinical Trials Abandoned, UnPublished

August 4, 2016

(UPI) – Researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital say the efforts of children, as well as researchers and funding sources, in hundreds of clinical trials are being wasted by studies that are either not finished or never published. Hundreds of clinical trials involving children are discontinued early, and even more that are completed never get published, despite legislative initiatives encouraging more pediatric studies across the country, according to a review of medical literature.

N.I.H. May Resume Funding Experiments with Human Stem Cells in Animal Embryos

August 4, 2016

(New York times) – The National Institutes of Health announced on Thursday it is considering lifting its ban on funding some research that injects human stem cells into animal embryos. The N.I.H. announced its proposal in a blog post by Carrie Wolinetz, the associate director for science policy, and in the Federal Register. The purpose of trying to grow human tissues or organs in animals is to better understand human diseases and further progress in developing therapies to treat them.

There’s a Possible Cure for ‘Bubble Boy’ Disease. It Will Cost $665,000

August 4, 2016

(STAT News) – GlaxoSmithKline has developed what looks like a cure for a rare and deadly disease, and it’s going to cost $665,000 for a single dose. That sky-high price tag — more than twice the average price of a house — is likely to stir what’s already a long-simmering debate in health care: How much should curative therapies cost, and how should society pay for them? GSK’s drug, called Strimvelis, is a gene therapy for severe combined immune deficiency, an inborn illness that leaves children unable to protect themselves against infection.

Beyond Fitbit: ‘Neural Dust’ Puts Invisible Cyborg Tech Deep Inside You

August 4, 2016

(CNet) – Monitoring your heart rate and VO2 max (maximum oxygen volume) with the latest fitness tracker is nifty, but researchers are developing new, tiny tech to keep track of just about any organ, nerve or muscle in real time. If that’s not futuristic-cyborg-cool enough for you, the so-called “neural dust” could also be used to stimulate nerves and muscles, ushering in a new era of “electroceutical” treatment for things like epilepsy or inflammation.

Woman Selfish for Giving Birth at 62, AMA President Says

August 4, 2016

(Australian Broadcasting Co.) – A woman who gave birth at the age of 62 after undergoing IVF has been labelled selfish by the president of the Australian Medical Association. In a tweet, Dr Michael Gannon said there were “greater priorities in women’s health”. “Anyone thought ahead to its teens? Selfish, wrong,” he said. Frances Perry Private Hospital in Melbourne’s inner north said the woman was recuperating after the baby’s birth.

Lab-on-a-Chip Breakthrough Aims to Help Physicians Detect Cancer and Diseases at the Nanoscale

August 4, 2016

(Nanowerk) – IBM scientists have developed a new lab-on-a-chip technology that can, for the first time, separate biological particles at the nanoscale and could help enable physicians to detect diseases such as cancer before symptoms appear. As reported today in the journal Nature Nanotechnology (“Nanoscale Lateral Displacement Arrays for Separation of Exosomes and Colloids Down to 20nm”), the IBM team’s results show size-based separation of bioparticles down to 20 nanometers (nm) in diameter, a scale that gives access to important particles such as DNA, viruses and exosomes.

A New Edition of European Journal of Human Genetics Is Now Available

August 4, 2016

European Journal of Human Genetics (vol. 24, no. 8, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “A Decision Tool to Guide the Ethics Review of a Challenging Breed of Emerging Genomic Projects” by Yann Joly, Derek So, Gladys Osien, Laura Crimi, Martin Bobrow, Don Chalmers, Susan E Wallace, Nikolajs Zeps, and Bartha Knoppers
  • “Post-Mortem Testing; Germline BRCA1/2 Variant Detection Using Archival FFPE Non-Tumor Tissue. A New Paradigm in Genetic Counseling” by Yann Joly, Derek So, Gladys Osien, Laura Crimi, Martin Bobrow, Don Chalmers, Susan E Wallace, Nikolajs Zeps, and Bartha Knoppers

 

A New Edition of Journal of Medical Ethics Is Now Available

August 4, 2016

Journal of Medical Ethics (vol. 42, no. 8, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Adolescent Autonomy Revisited: Clinicians Need Clearer Guidance” by Joe Brierley and Victor Larcher
  • “Legal and Ethical Aspects of Organ Donation After Euthanasia in Belgium and the Netherlands” by Jan Bollen, Rankie ten Hoopen, Dirk Ysebaert, Walther van Mook, and Ernst van Heurn
  • “Canada on Course to Introduce Permissive Assisted Dying Regime” by Udo Schuklenk
  • “Disclosure of Incidental Constituents of Psychotherapy as a Moral Obligation for Psychiatrists and Psychotherapists” by Manuel Trachsel, Jens Gaab
  • The ASBH Code of Ethics and the Limits of Professional Healthcare Ethics Consultations” by Abraham Schwab
  • “Snakes and Ladders: State Interventions and the Place of Liberty in Public Health Policy” by Angus J Dawson
  • “How Not to Test the Prevalence of Therapeutic Misconception” by Paul S Appelbaum
  • “Faith, Hope And (No) Clarity” by Barry Lyons
  • “Conflicting Messages Concerning Current Strategies Against Research Misconduct in Japan: A Call for Ethical Spontaneity” by Atsushi Asai, Taketoshi Okita, Aya Enzo
  • “Appropriateness of No-Fault Compensation for Research-Related Injuries From an African Perspective: An Appeal for Action by African Countries” by Patrick Dongosolo Kamalo, Lucinda Manda-Taylor, Stuart Rennie

 

A New Edition of New Genetics and Society is Now Available

August 4, 2016

New Genetics and Society (Latest Articles) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “The Collection of “Quality” Umbilical Cord Blood for Stem Cell Treatments: Conflicts, Compromises, and Clinical Pragmatism” by Laura L. Machin

 

A New Edition of Clinical Trials Is Now Available

August 4, 2016

Clinical Trials (vol. 13, no. 3, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Cluster-Randomized Trials: A Closer Look” by Andrew D McRae, Monica Taljaard, and Charles Weijer
  • “Research Involving Pediatric Stem Cell Donors: A Way Forward” by David Wendler, Nirali N Shah, Michael A Pulsipher, Terry Fry, and Christine Grady

A New Edition of The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy Is Now Available

August 4, 2016

The Journal of Medicine & Philosophy (vol. 41, no. 4, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Keeping it Ethically Real” by Dien Ho
  • “Clinical Ethics Consultants are not “Ethics” Experts—But They do Have Expertise” by Lisa M. Rasmussen
  • “Moral Expertise in the Clinic: Lessons Learned from Medicine and Science” by Leah McClimans and Anne Slowther
  • “Expertise, Ethics Expertise, and Clinical Ethics Consultation: Achieving Terminological Clarity” by Ana S. Iltis and Mark Sheehan

 

The Next Health Fad? Blood Transfusions from Young People

August 3, 2016

(MIT Technology Review) – The latest advancement in anti-aging therapies hardly sounds like modern medicine at all. Ambrosia, a startup based in Monterey, California, is launching a clinical trial to inject the blood of young people into just about anyone aged 35 and up—if they’re willing to pay $8,000. Young-to-old blood transfusions hit the limelight in 2014 when Harvard Stem Cell Institute researcher Amy Wagers discovered that the blood of young mice improved muscle, heart, and brain function in older mice. Scientists sewed the skin of two mice together, allowing their circulatory systems to merge. The surgery, called parabiosis, was first performed in the 1860s but has seen a resurgence of interest following Wagers’s study.

FDA’s Dueling Priorities

August 3, 2016

(The Atlantic) – Medical-device companies—unlike drug conglomerates—are predominantly small businesses, and the process of bringing their inventions to market can be prohibitively expensive. After a device is finally cleared, its design may become obsolete within a couple of years. For drug licensing, part of the time burden comes from the FDA’s dueling mandates of safety and efficacy, each of which requires different kinds of tests and controls. Each stage of research emphasizes the two factors to different extents, and these priorities are reflected in the experimental design. The weighting of safety and efficacy priorities remains a subject of debate.

Why ‘Useless’ Surgery Is Still Popular

August 3, 2016

(New York Times) – “I think there is a placebo effect not only on patients but on doctors,” Dr. Kallmes adds. “The successful patient is burned into their memories and the not-so-successful patient is not. Doctors can have a selective memory that leads them to conclude that, ‘Darn it, it works pretty well.’ ” The latest controversy — and the operation that arguably has been studied the most in randomized clinical trials — is surgery for a torn meniscus, a sliver of cartilage that acts as a shock absorber in the knee.

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