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A New Edition of Health and Social Work Is Now Available

July 6, 2018

Health and Social Work (vol. 43, no. 2, 2018) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Ethical Issues in Integrated Health Care: Implications for Social Workers” by Frederic G Reamer

 

A New Edition of Human Reproduction Is Now Available

July 6, 2018

Human Reproduction (vol. 33, no. 5, 2018) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Of Mice and Men: Long-Term Safety of Assisted Reproduction Treatments” by Richard M Sharpe
  • “Is There a Relation between the Time to ICSI and the Reproductive Outcomes?” by A Pujol et al.
  • ” Doctor–Couple Communication During Assisted Reproductive Technology Visits” by D Leone et al.

 

Vulnerable Rural Hospitals Face Tough Decisions on Questionable Billing Schemes

July 5, 2018

(NPR) – The new management had dramatic effects on the hospital’s finances, according to a report from the Missouri state auditor. In six months, Putnam Memorial generated $92 million in revenue. By comparison, the audit reported, the hospital had generated just $7.5 million the year before. But little of that revenue was staying with the hospital, according to Missouri auditor Nicole Galloway’s August 2017 audit report. “It appears that Putnam County Memorial Hospital is being used as a shell company for questionable lab activity that’s occurring across the country,” Galloway said in an interview after releasing the audit.

As Drug Resistance Grows, Combining Antibiotics Could Turn Up New Treatments

July 5, 2018

(STAT News) – Combining certain antibiotics could help them pack a one-two punch against harmful bacteria, according to a new study published Wednesday in Nature. Nassos Typas and his colleagues at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Germany tested 3,000 different combinations of antibiotics with each other or with drugs, food additives, and other compounds on three common types of bacteria that infect humans.

South Africa Paying Too Much for Private Healthcare: Watchdog

July 5, 2018

(Reuters) – South Africans are paying too much for private healthcare, the country’s antitrust watchdog said on Thursday, adding patients are sometimes prescribed treatments they don’t need by an industry with limited competition. Presenting its findings of a four-year investigation into the sector, the Competition Commission said private health providers sometimes recommended pricey treatments unnecessarily.

States Expand Telemedicine to Allow Prescribing of Controlled Substances

July 5, 2018

(Modern Healthcare) – Legislators are beginning to open up new avenues for providers to use telemedicine to prescribe medications, a move that’s indicative of growing acceptance of virtual care as a way to improve access. On Sunday, Connecticut became the latest state to allow providers to prescribe controlled substances through telemedicine for treating psychiatric disabilities and substance use disorder. Seven other states have recently passed similar laws allowing the prescription of controlled substances via telemedicine.

A Vaccine We Don’t Even Use Anymore Is a Reason Polio Keeps Spreading–Yes, Really

July 5, 2018

(Vox) – The global push to immunize children against polio has been an incredible success, reducing polio cases by 99.9 percent.  But there’s a lingering obstacle to a polio-free world: A scant number of people who got one version of the vaccine before it was phased out in 2016 carry a variant of the polio virus that was in that vaccine and has since mutated. The mutated virus can now be passed around in areas where few people have been vaccinated, sickening some along the way. This is precisely what’s playing out right now, in a very small polio outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and with a handful of cases in a few other countries.

He Went in for a Heart Transplant. He Suffered Brain Damage. Now His Family Is Suing St. Luke’s.

July 5, 2018

(ProPublica) – In May, an investigation by ProPublica and the Houston Chronicle revealed that the once-renowned program performed an outsized number of transplants resulting in deaths in recent years and has lost several top physicians. Those issues surfaced after the hospital was purchased in 2013 by Catholic Health Initiatives, a Colorado-based nonprofit hospital chain. Two weeks after the stories were published, the hospital voluntarily suspended the heart transplant program following the deaths of three patients in the first five months of 2018.

Fertility Problems, Reproductive Technology Tied to Slightly More Birth Defects

July 5, 2018

(Reuters) – Women who struggle to get pregnant or use reproductive technologies like in vitro fertilization (IVF) may be more likely to have preemies and kids with birth defects than their peers who conceive without difficulty, a U.S. study suggests. Infertility has long been linked to an increased risk of premature deliveries, and the current study offered fresh evidence of this. Compared to women without any fertility issues, women who struggled to conceive were 39 percent more likely to have premature babies, while the increased risk associated with using reproductive technologies was 79 percent.

Hospital Says It’s Not Liable for Loss of Eggs, Embryos in Freezer Malfunction

July 5, 2018

(CNN) – University Hospitals in Cleveland denies that it’s liable for the loss of more than 4,000 eggs and embryos in a freezer failure, in response to lawsuits filed by several families. The hospital responded in court documents after the cryopreservation system malfunctioned in early March, affecting embryos and eggs belonging to at least 950 families.

Google’s Artificial Intelligence Ethics Won’t Curb War by Algorithm

July 5, 2018

(Wired) – The Al Mantharis’ lawyers worry their clients may have been killed on the basis of metadata, which are used to select targets. Such data is drawn from a web of intelligence sources, much of it harvested from mobile phones – including text messages, email, web browsing behaviour, location, and patterns of behaviour. While the US army and CIA are secretive about how they select targets – a process known as the kill chain – metadata plays a role. Big data analytics, business intelligence and artificial intelligence systems are then used to spot the correlations that supposedly identify the target.

A New Edition of Ethics, Medicine, and Public Health Is Now Available

July 5, 2018

Ethics, Medicine, and Public Health (vol. 4, no. 1, 2018) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Biomedical Ethics, Public Health Ethics, and Bioethics: Identifying the Interrelationships Between Three Distinct Fields” by J.P. Spike
  • “Praise of a Medical and Public Health Ethics for the 21st Century” by C. Hervé and P. Charlier
  • “Principles for Public Health Ethics” by J.P. Spike
  • “Ethical Competencies for Public Health Personnel” by L. M. Lee
  • “Resolving Disputes among Inter-Professional Codes of Ethics” by S. H. Linder
  • “Health Zones in Oregon: Exploring the Ethical Deliberation Process in County Public Health” by K. M. Dirksen, S. D. Present, P. Mason, and D. Emerick
  • “How Do Nuclear Medicine Physicians Deal with Ethical Aspects of Communicating Results to Patients after PET Performed for Oncological Indications? A French National Survey ” by S. Gonzalez et al.
  • “Court-Ordered Treatment and Toxic Users: Difficulties in Their Implementation” by E. Christin et al.
  • “Bioethics North and South: Creating a Common Ground” by S.H. Miles and A.K. Laar
  • “Blueprint for Scaling Advance Care Planning Conversations to Medical Practices” by G. E. Bondi
  • “An Anthropology of Women’s Body According to the FEMEN Organization” by P. Charlier and S. Deo

 

A New Edition of Social Science & Medicine Is Now Available

July 5, 2018

Social Science & Medicine (vol. 204, 2018) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Valuing Health at the End of Life: A Review of Stated Preference Studies in the Social Sciences Literature” by Koonal K. Shah, Aki Tsuchiya, and Allan J. Wailoo
  • “Men’s Work, Women’s Work, and Mental Health: A Longitudinal Investigation of the Relationship Between the Gender Composition of Occupations and Mental Health” by Allison Milner et al.
  • “Modeling Racial Disparities in Physical Health Via Close Relationship Functioning: A Life Course Approach” by David Matthew Doyle, Pam Factor-Litvak, and Bruce G. Link
  • “Does Health Insurance Coverage or Improved Quality Protect Better Against Out-of-Pocket Payments? Experimental Evidence from the Philippines” by Natascha Wagner, Stella Quimbo, Riti Shimkhada, and John Peabody
  • “Understanding and Alleviating Maternal Postpartum Distress: Perspectives from First-Time Mothers in Australia” by Kwok Hong Law et al.
  • “Developing Religiously-Tailored Health Messages for Behavioral Change: Introducing the Reframe, Reprioritize, and Reform (“3R”) Model” by Aasim I. Padela et al.
  • “Does the Ethno-Religious Diversity of a Neighbourhood Affect the Perceived Health of Its Residents?” by Kenisha Russell Jonsson andNeli Demireva

 

Routine DNA Tests Will Put NHS at the ‘Forefront of Medicine’

July 4, 2018

(The Guardian) – People in England will have access to DNA tests on an unprecedented scale from the autumn when the NHS becomes the first health service in the world to routinely offer genomic medicine. From 1 October, hospitals across England will be connected to specialist centres that read, analyse and interpret patient DNA to help diagnose rare diseases, match patients to the most effective treatments, and reduce adverse drug reactions. The move marks a big step towards “precision medicine”, which offers more efficient therapies that are tailored to individual patients.

The Labs Growing Human Embryos for Longer Than Ever Before

July 4, 2018

(Nature) – For two tense weeks in mid-2013, developmental biologist Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz was chasing a world record. She and her colleagues at the University of Cambridge, UK, were attempting to grow human embryos in the lab for longer than had ever been done before. They wanted to glean insights into how a tiny blob of cells transforms itself into a complex, multipart structure. Previous efforts had stalled after about a week, but Zernicka-Goetz knew there was much more to learn about human development beyond that point. The researchers started with embryos that had been donated by women who no longer needed them for in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures.

Heart Function Restored with Human Stem Cells in Study with Monkeys

July 4, 2018

(UPI) – Heart function in monkeys has been restored with human stem cells, according to a study, showing promise the method will work in humans with heart failure. Researchers at the University of Wisconsin Medicine in Seattle found the hearts pumped vigorously again after embryonic stem cells formed new muscle in the organ. Their findings were published Monday in the journal Nature Biotechnology.

‘Remote’ IVF Allows Use of Anonymous Donor Eggs Without Travel

July 4, 2018

(The Irish Times) – Irish women undergoing fertility treatment can now avail of anonymously donated eggs for use in IVF without having to travel abroad, according to an international clinic which has facilities in Ireland. The Institut Marquès, which has clinics in Dublin and Clane, Co Kildare, says it has developed a new programme which will allow patients to avoid travelling and to “remotely” carry out IVF with donor eggs.

At Least 8 Million IVF Babies Born in 40 Years Since Historic First

July 3, 2018

(CNN) – The world’s first in-vitro fertilization baby was born in 1978 in the UK. Since then, 8 million babies have been born worldwide as a result of IVF and other advanced fertility treatments, an international committee estimates.  In-vitro fertilization involves removing eggs from a woman’s ovaries and mixing them with sperm outside the body, typically in a Petri dish; “in vitro” is Latin for “in glass.” Fertilized by this process, the eggs become embryos that can be placed in a woman’s uterus, where they can develop into a fetus and eventually a baby.

Deaths from Bacterial Disease in Puerto Rico Spiked After Maria

July 3, 2018

(CNN) – Puerto Rico’s own records list so many cases of the bacterial disease leptospirosis that officials should have declared an “epidemic” or an “outbreak” after Hurricane Maria instead of denying that one occurred, according to seven medical experts who reviewed previously unreleased data for CNN and the Centro de Periodismo Investigativo (CPI). A Puerto Rico mortality database — which CNN and CPI sued the island’s Demographic Registry to obtain — lists 26 deaths in the six months after Hurricane Maria that were labeled by clinicians as “caused” by leptospirosis, a bacterial illness known to spread through water and soil, especially in the aftermath of storms.

Documents Raise New Concerns About Lithium Study on Children

July 3, 2018

(ProPublica) – Newly obtained records raise additional concerns about the research and oversight of Dr. Mani Pavuluri, a star pediatric psychiatrist at the University of Illinois at Chicago whose clinical trial studying the effects of the powerful drug lithium on children was shuttered for misconduct.

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