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IVF Clinics Caught Making False and Misleading Claims About Success Rates

November 15, 2016

(Sydney Morning Herald) – Some of Australia’s leading IVF clinics have been caught advertising false or misleading information about their success rates in what the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission has described as a “race to the bottom” targeting vulnerable people. On Monday, the ACCC said “several major IVF clinics” and some smaller ones had been asked to change claims on their websites following an investigation into the increasingly competitive and profitable industry.

Increase in IVF Complications Raises Concerns Over Use of Fertility Drugs

November 15, 2016

(The Guardian) – Increased numbers of women suffered from a serious complication of IVF last year, according to official figures that raise concerns about the use of powerful fertility drugs. In 2015, 60 women were admitted to hospital with severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS), a 40% increase on the previous year. The condition, which is triggered when the ovaries swell up and leak fluid, is potentially life-threatening. Symptoms include abdominal swelling and pain, nausea, dehydration and blood clots in the legs.

Disgraced Stem-Cell Entrepreneur Under Fresh Investigation

November 14, 2016

(Nature) – Public prosecutors in Turin, Italy, are investigating whether disgraced stem-cell entrepreneur Davide Vannoni — convicted on criminal charges last year for administering unproven stem-cell therapies in Italy — is offering his treatments again, this time in eastern Europe. In March 2015, Vannoni was convicted on charges of conspiracy and fraud related to his treatments, which had been declared dangerous by the Italian Health Authority (AIFA). His case was a cause célèbre among Italian scientists, who fought for many years to stop him administering stem cells to patients through his Stamina Foundation.

Where Hepatitis C Rates Are Seven Times the US Average–And a Cure Is Kept Out of Reach

November 14, 2016

(STAT News) – A major reason is cost, with list prices for some 12-week treatment courses approaching $100,000. But a series of other forces helps explain why Kentucky is struggling to respond to the hepatitis C crisis, including a growing opioid epidemic that is fueling new cases and a changing patient base that is demanding hard choices be made about who gets treatment first. With opioid use seeding the spread of infectious disease across the country, this state could be a case study in how hepatitis C affects other areas, and what happens when demands for specialists, surveillance, and treatment outstrip the ability of health systems to respond.

Some People with Alzheimer’s Brain Plaques Stay Sharp

November 14, 2016

(UPI) – In a discovery that challenges conventional thinking, researchers report that several people over the age of 90 had excellent memory even though their brains showed signs that they had Alzheimer’s disease. The meaning of the findings isn’t entirely clear. The elderly people, whose brains were studied after their deaths, may have been in the early stages of Alzheimer’s, although the researchers said they doubt this. It’s also possible that something about these people — or their brains — could have kept dementia symptoms in check.

Embryonic Stem Cells and Fetal Tissue Researcher–Will Trump Intervene?

November 14, 2016

(Science) – Of all the materials valued in biomedical research, embryonic stem (ES) cells and fetal tissue have gotten disproportionate attention from politicians. Because creating ES cell lines initially requires destroying a human embryo, President George W. Bush tightly restricted the use of federal funds for research on all but a few stem cell lines. President Barack Obama then made lifting those restrictions one of his first official actions after he took office in 2009. More recently, accusations that abortion clinics were unlawfully selling fetal tissue to researchers has stoked opposition to that type of research. So far, however, members of Congress have been unable to enact any restrictions into law. Now, biomedical researchers are wondering: How will a Donald J. Trump administration handle these ethically delicate materials?

German Parliament Passes Controversial Law on Dementia Treatments

November 14, 2016

(Deutsche Welle) – Germany’s lower house of parliament, the Bundestag, on Friday passed a law changing the conditions researchers must meet to conduct clinical research on dementia patients. Previously, doctors were only permitted to test new medication to specifically treat patients themselves. Under the new framework, doctors can test a wider array of medicinal products that may not be catered to current patients but are rather designed to treat future patients.

A Made-in-Africa Genetic Chip Could Revolutionize Medicine Made for Africans

November 14, 2016

(Quartz) – Precision medicine—the practice of scanning patients’ genes to devise tailor-made treatment programs—is already routine in rich countries for some diseases. Oncologists in the US and Europe use genetic tests to determine which treatments will work best for their patients’ cancers. But Africans and people of African descent, such as African Americans, have been left behind in this medical revolution. Out of the more than 35 million participants that have participated in genetic screening studies to date, 81% were of European ancestry. Of the rest, three-quarters were Asians. Only 3% were of African origin.

Most Child Deaths Concentrated in 10 Asian, African Nations: Study

November 11, 2016

(Reuters) –  Sixty percent of the world’s 5.9 million children who died before their fifth birthday last year were in 10 countries in Asia and Africa, said a study published on Friday, prompting calls for action to reduce the mortality.  The study published in The Lancet medical journal said the latest data highlights the inequality in children’s death among the 194 countries it studied, even though the number of under-five deaths has fallen by 4 million compared to 2010.

The Power of Placebo: How Our Brains Can Heal Our Minds and Bodies

November 11, 2016

(Scientific American) –  In his new book, Suggestible You: The Curious Science of Your Brain’s Ability to Deceive, Transform and Heal (National Geographic Publishing, November 2016; 288 pages), science writer and Scientific American contributor Erik Vance seeks to explain one of our brain’s most remarkable powers: its ability to heal both mind and body. Vance explores the profound influence our thoughts, feelings and expectations can have on our well-being—how a positive outlook can, for example, help ease physical pain. The ways in which this mind–body link manifests remain mysterious, but decades of research have clued us in to some fascinating connections.

To Build a Viable HIV Vaccine, Start from the Molecule Up

November 11, 2016

(Wired) –  Compared to methodical do-no-harm modern medicine, historical vaccinologists were cowboys. They used coarse methods that only let them see results at the end of their research. And they took a lot of risks with their patients’ health. And now—though patient safety standards are better, and biologists know more about the immune system—vaccines are basically developed using the same old primitive methods devised by pioneers like Edward Jenner and Jonas Salk. In order to trigger an immune system response, they use a weakened, dead, or deconstructed version of the virus. But now the field is starting to move away from empirical gunslinging, and towards rational drug design.

The Future of Artificial Intelligence and Cybernetics

November 11, 2016

(MIT Technology Review) –  But what if the robot has a biological brain made up of brain cells, possibly even human neurons? Neurons grown under laboratory conditions on an array of non-invasive electrodes provide an attractive alternative with which to realize a new form of robot controller. In the near future, we will see thinking robots with brains not very dissimilar to those of humans. That development will raise many social and ethical questions.

Skin Patches Instead of Needles: Can Nanotechnology Vaccinate the World?

November 11, 2016

(The Conversation) –  Think of a device which is around postage stamp size and has thousands upon thousands of tiny spikes on its surface: this is a nanopatch. There are approximately 20,000 projections per square centimeter on each patch, each around 60 to 100 micrometres in length. One micrometre is one million times smaller than a metre, so the height of these tiny spikes is approximately the width of a human hair.

Paralyzed Monkeys Walk Again with Wireless ‘Brain-Spine Interface’

November 11, 2016

(Reuters) –  Swiss scientists have helped monkeys with spinal cord injuries regain control of non-functioning limbs in research which might one day lead to paralyzed people being able to walk again.  The scientists, who treated the monkeys with a neuroprosthetic interface that acted as a wireless bridge between the brain and spine, say they have started small feasibility studies in humans to trial some components.

Egg ‘Nobbles’ Can Be Used to Create Embryos, Say Scientists in Fertility Breakthrough

November 11, 2016

(The Telegraph) – Infertile  women have been offered new hope after scientists discovered that ‘nobbles’ on their eggs can be used to generate human embryos in a breakthrough which could double the chance of having a baby.  Most human eggs contain appendages called ‘polar bodies’ which are tiny nodules of genetic material left over when a cell divides.  They usually vanish over time but scientists have now discovered that it is possible to transfer donor egg matter – from which the nucleus has been removed – to create an egg which can be fertilised by a sperm to create a human embryo.

Researchers Discover Genetic Alterations in Autism Gene That Reduces Brain Activity

November 11, 2016

(News-Medical) –  Scientists at McMaster University’s Stem Cell and Cancer Research Institute in collaboration with Sick Children’s Hospital have discovered genetic alterations in the gene DIXDC1 in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). This gene was found to change the way brain cells grow and communicate.  This finding, published today in Cell Reports, provides new insights into ASD that will guide identification of new medications for people with ASD. This is critical because ASD affects one in 68 individuals, and there are no medications that target the core symptoms of this complex disorder.

How to Defeat Dementia

November 10, 2016

(Nature) –  Dementia is the fifth-biggest cause of death in high-income countries, but it is the most expensive disease to manage because patients require constant, costly care for years. And yet, research funding for dementia pales in comparison with that for many other diseases. At the US National Institutes of Health (NIH), for example, annual funding for dementia in 2015 was only around $700 million, compared with some $2 billion for cardiovascular disease and more than $5 billion for cancer.

Medical Marijuana Victories in Florida, North Dakota, Arkansas, Montana Turn the Tide

November 10, 2016

(Washington Post) –  Tuesday was a banner night for medical marijuana — with ballot initiatives in numerous states widening access to the substance for Americans seeking relief from pain or a treatment for illness.  Massachusetts and California, where Napster co-founder and cancer philanthropist Sean Parker helped fund a campaign to legalize the drug, were among the states passing new recreational marijuana laws. The tide also turned in Florida, North Dakota and Arkansas — where similar measures were defeated in the past — and in Montana where measures regarding medical marijuana were passed.

Novel System to Get Dying Patients an Experimental Cancer Drug Raises Hopes–and Thorny Questions

November 10, 2016

(STAT News) – The drug was still experimental, but clinical trials suggested it could be a lifesaver for patients with a lethal form of blood cancer called multiple myeloma.  And those patients were clamoring to get it. They overwhelmed drug maker Janssen Pharmaceuticals with requests for the medication.  Most companies don’t know how to handle such requests. Often, it’s the richest patients, or the best connected, or those who run the most compelling social media campaigns who end up getting the drug. Everyone else is out of luck.

Assisted Suicide Is Now Legal in Colorado

November 10, 2016

(The Verge) –  Colorado becomes the sixth state to have a so-called “right-to-die law,” joining Washington, Oregon, California, Vermont, and Montana. Its citizens have voted to approve Prop 106. The measure allows Colorado residents over 18 to request assistance to die if they are ill and have less than six months to live. They must also be judged competent enough to make their own choice and must voluntarily ask for the medicine that would kill them. Before, helping someone end their life was a crime.

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