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Second Example Reported of a Stem-Cell Transplant in the Clinic Leading to HIV Remission

April 2, 2019

(Nature) – HIV infects immune cells, and the current standard treatment is long-term use of antiretroviral drugs. This keeps virus levels low in the bloodstream but doesn’t eradicate HIV from cells in the body. In 2009, it was reported1 that a person with HIV (commonly referred to as the Berlin patient) who was treated for cancer using a stem-cell transplant subsequently went into viral remission — the virus became undetectable in their body, even in the absence of antiretroviral therapy. No other cases of long-term HIV remission occurring in this way had been recorded since then. But now, writing in Nature, Gupta et al. report a person who has achieved HIV remission for at least 18 months.

Cholera Kills Two, Infects 1,400 in Cyclone-Hit Mozambique

April 2, 2019

(Medical Xpress) – A cyclone-induced cholera outbreak in central Mozambique has killed two people and infected more than 1,400, the government announced Tuesday on the eve of the launch of a mass vaccination drive. Health authorities said 376 new cholera cases had been reported Tuesday, taking the total number of people infected to 1,428 since the first cases were reported last week.

Family Behind OxyContin Calls Opioid Suit False, Misleading

April 2, 2019

(ABC News) – The Sackler family says a lawsuit filed by Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey that accuses Connecticut-based Purdue Pharma and the family of hiding the risks of opioids from doctors and patients is riddled with inaccurate and misleading statements. The Sacklers are accusing Healey of cherry picking from hundreds of internal documents in an attempt to wrongly vilify the family for the public health crisis.

It’s Tough Being the First Birth Control App

April 2, 2019

(Bloomberg) – What they didn’t expect is that despite all the work they put into trying to follow the rules, they would still be vulnerable to criticism—in particular to a public-relations crisis that erupted last year after a number of Swedish users became pregnant unintentionally. Detractors questioned the integrity of Natural Cycles’ research and rejected the app’s designation as a contraceptive. “There are so many women who use the other apps as birth control, and they aren’t scientifically backed, and we are the ones that are getting criticism,” Berglund says.

Suicide Risk Grew After Missouri Medicaid Kids Shifted to Managed Care, Hospitals Say

April 2, 2019

(Kaiser Health News) – After more than 2,000 Missouri children diagnosed with mental illness were shifted from traditional Medicaid into three for-profit managed-care companies, the state’s hospitals noticed an alarming trend: a doubling in the percentage who had thoughts of suicide or attempted suicide. Additionally, the average length of stay for these children in psychiatric hospitals dropped from 10 days to seven following the Medicaid change in May 2017, according to a study released this month by the Missouri Hospital Association.

Ethical Questions Raised on Body Donation After Medically Assisted Death

April 1, 2019

(Medical Xpress) – The legalization of medical assistance in dying (MAID) in Canada has resulted in some people choosing to donate their bodies to anatomy programs, but it has raised profound ethical issues, says McMaster University’s head of anatomy. Bruce Wainman, director of the Education Program in Anatomy at McMaster, said the anatomical scientist community needs to establish guidelines around these donations.

Congo Ebola Outbreak Spreading Faster Than Ever: WHO

April 1, 2019

(Reuters) – Democratic Republic of Congo’s Ebola outbreak is spreading at its fastest rate yet, eight months after it was first detected, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Monday. Each of the past two weeks has registered a record number of new cases, marking a sharp setback for efforts to respond to the second biggest outbreak ever, as militia violence and community resistance have impeded access to affected areas.

61-Year-Old Grandmother Carries a Baby for Her Son and His Husband

April 1, 2019

(GMA) – Cecile Eledge is a 61-year-old mother of three who has been health conscious her entire life, from being “very conscientious” about her diet to staying active. Last Monday, March 25, Eledge “reaped the rewards” of that healthy lifestyle when she gave birth to her own granddaughter, a healthy 5-pound baby girl named Uma.

IVF Tied to Slight Increased Risk of Rare Childhood Cancers

April 1, 2019

(Reuters) – Certain rare childhood cancers may be more common in children conceived via in vitro fertilization (IVF), a U.S. study suggests, but parents needn’t lose sleep over this finding, according to the researchers. “For the few cancers that seemed associated with IVF the absolute risk was still extremely rare,” said lead study author Logan Spector of the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis.

‘This Is What Nazis Wanted to Do’: Aussie Couples Are Spending $20,000 to Choose Eye Colour and Sex of Their Children

April 1, 2019

(Daily Mail) – Australian couples are spending $20,000 to choose the eye colour and sex of their ‘designer babies’ at an overseas clinic. But critics have slammed the practice, claiming it is reminiscent of ‘what the Nazis wanted to do’. The Fertility Institutes, which has clinics across the United States, Mexico, and India, revealed on Saturday it has helped 370 Australian couples choose their child’s gender. The practice is banned in Australia. In addition to choosing the gender of their baby, 14 couples paid the controversial clinic to select their child’s eye colour, with blue being the most requested.

The Pharma Industry Has Failed Stroke, So Doctors Are Looking Elsewhere

April 1, 2019

(Quartz) – The cutting-edge treatment for stroke isn’t an elegantly crafted drug or a gene therapy, but a device that works like a pipe cleaner. It’s a thin metal catheter that snakes its way up from a patient’s thigh, through their heart, and into the blood vessels of the brain, where it clears the obstruction causing the stroke. The technology, called “mechanical thrombectomy” or “endovascular therapy,” has become the preferred treatment for certain set of ischemic strokes not because it’s easy or inexpensive—it is neither of those things—but because the pharmaceutical industry has largely failed to develop a drug that works as well.

Pregnancy Outcomes ‘Very Good’ After Stem Cell Transplant

April 1, 2019

(Medscape) – Women due to undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) can be reassured that, even if they have to rely on artificial reproductive techniques (ART) to achieve a later pregnancy, the likelihood of the normal delivery or a normal weight baby is high, says an expert. However, not all women in Europe have equal access to fertility preservation, with some HSCT patients only offered the techniques if they have a nonmalignant disease.

First Gene Therapy to Treat Rare Blood Disease Nears European Approval

April 1, 2019

(STAT News) – T he first gene therapy to treat a rare blood disorder is one step closer to approval Friday following a recommendation by European officials. Lentiglobin, the gene therapy for beta-thalassemia developed by Cambridge, Mass.-based Bluebird Bio, was recommended for approval by the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP), the drug-reviewing arm of the European Medicines Agency. A final approval decision is expected within the next three months.

A New Edition of JAMA Is Now Available

April 1, 2019

JAMA Open (vol. 1, no. 2, 2018) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Finding the Patient in Informatics” by Indra Neil Sarkar
  • “Next Generation Pathways into Biomedical Informatics: Lessons from 10 Years of the Vanderbilt Biomedical Informatics Summer Internship Program” by Kim M Unertl et al.
  • “Characteristics of the Healthcare Information Technology Workforce in the HITECH Era: Underestimated in Size, Still Growing, and Adapting to Advanced Uses” by William R Hersh, Keith W Boone, and Annette M Totten
  • “Research Participation Preferences as Expressed through a Patient Portal: Implications of Demographic Characteristics” by Jihad S Obeid et al.
  • “Implementation of Electronic Charting Is Not Associated with Significant Change in Physician Productivity in an Academic Emergency Department” by Dusadee Sarangarm
  • “Using Electronic Health Records to Characterize Prescription Patterns: Focus on Antidepressants in Nonpsychiatric Outpatient Settings” by Joseph J Deferio et al.
  • “Learning Optimal Opioid Prescribing and Monitoring: A Simulation Study of Medical Residents” by Thomas G Kannampallil et al.
  • “If You Build It, They May Not Come: Modifiable Barriers to Patient Portal Use among Pre- and Post-Kidney Transplant Patients” by Mark B Lockwood et al.
  • “Trends in Anesthesiology Research: A Machine Learning Approach to Theme Discovery and Summarization” by Alexander Rusanov, Riccardo Miotto, and Chunhua Weng

A New Edition of Nursing Ethics Is Now Available

April 1, 2019

Nursing Ethics (vol. 25, no. 7, 2018) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Direct-to-Consumer advertising Effects on Nurse–Patient Relationship, Authority, and Prescribing Appropriateness” by Anna A Filipova
  • “Nurse Participation in Legal Executions: An Ethics Round-Table Discussion” by Linda Shields, et al.
  • “Factors that Impact on Emergency Nurses’ Ethical Decision-Making Ability” by Barbara Alba
  • “Limitation of Therapeutic Effort Experienced by Intensive Care Nurses” by Juan Francisco Velarde-García et al.
  • Neonatal Nurses’ Response to a Hypothetical Premature Birth Situation: What if It Was My Baby?” by Janet Green, Philip Darbyshire, Anne Adams, and Debra Jackson
  • “Ethical Decision-Making Regarding Infant Viability: A Discussion” by Janet Kelly and Emma Welch
  • Validity of the Italian Code of Ethics for Everyday Nursing Practice” by Paola Gobbi et al.
  • “Borderline Personality Disorder and the Ethics of Risk Management: The Action/Consequence model” by Dan Warrender
  • “Intergenerational Differences in the Personal and Professional Values of Nurses” by Emine ?enyuva

 

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