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A New Edition of The American Journal of Bioethics Is Now Available

July 11, 2018

The American Journal of Bioethics (vol. 18, no. 5, 2018) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Why Bioethics Should Be Concerned With Medically Unexplained Symptoms” by Diane O’Leary
  • “Responding to Those Who Hope for a Miracle: Practices for Clinical Bioethicists” by Trevor M. Bibler, Myrick C. Shinall Jr., and Devan Stahl

 

A New Edition of Nursing Ethics Is Now Available

July 11, 2018

Nursing Ethics (vol. 25, no. 3, 2018) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Nurse Ethical Sensitivity: An Integrative Review” by Aimee Milliken
  • “Moral Distress of Nursing Undergraduates: Myth or Reality?” by Heloiza Maria Siqueira Rennó, Flávia Regina Souza Ramos, and Maria José Menezes Brito
  • “Distrust and Patients in Intercultural Healthcare: A Qualitative Interview Study” by Lise-Merete Alpers
  • “Nurses’ Narratives of Moral Identity: Making a Difference and Reciprocal Holding” by Elizabeth Peter, Anne Simmonds, and Joan Liaschenko
  • “Factors Influencing Emergency Nurses’ Ethical Problems During the Outbreak of MERS-CoV” by Jeong-Sil Choi and Ji-Soo Kim
  • “The Emotion: A Crucial Component in the Care of Critically Ill Patients” by Maria Sagrario Acebedo-Urdiales et al.
  • “Organisational and Individual Support for Nurses’ Ethical Competence: A Cross-Sectional Survey” by Tarja Poikkeus, Riitta Suhonen, Jouko Katajisto, and Helena Leino-Kilpi
  • “Ethical Issues of Prison Nursing: A Qualitative Study in Northern Italy” by Loredana Sasso et al.

 

A New Edition of Genetics in Medicine Is Now Available

July 11, 2018

Genetics in Medicine (vol. 20, no. 5, 2018) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Impact of HIPAA’s Minimum Necessary Standard on Genomic Data Sharing” by Barbara J Evans and Gail P Jarvik

 

A New Edition of Journal of Law and the Biosciences Is Now Available

July 11, 2018

Journal of Law and the Biosciences (vol. 5, no. 1, 2018) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “A Critique of National Solidarity in Transnational Organ Sharing in Europe” by Konstantin Tretyakov
  • “Cutting Edges and Weaving Threads in the Gene Editing (?)Evolution: Reconciling Scientific Progress with Legal, Ethical, and Social Concerns” by Ana Nordberg et al.
  • “The Generic Drug User Fee Amendments: An Economic Perspective” by Ernst R Berndt, Rena M Conti, and Stephen J Murphy
  • “The App Will See You Now: Mobile Health, Diagnosis, and the Practice of Medicine in Quebec and Ontario” by Michael Lang and Ma’n H Zawati
  • “The Impact of Virtual Reality on Implicit Racial Bias and Mock Legal Decisions” by Natalie Salmanowitz

 

A New Edition of Journal of Medical Ethics Is Now Available

July 11, 2018

Journal of Medical Ethics (vol. 44, no. 5, 2018) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Moral Narcissism and Moral Complicity in Global Health and Humanitarian Aid” by Mark Sheehan
  • “Institute of Medical Ethics Guidelines for Confirmation of Appointment, Promotion and Recognition of UK Bioethics and Medical Ethics Researchers” by Lucy Frit et al.
  • “Developments in the Practice of Physician-Assisted Dying: Perceptions of Physicians Who Had Experience with Complex Cases” by Marianne C Snijdewind et al.
  • “Dutch Practice of Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide: A Glimpse at the Edges of the Practice” by Timothy Quill
  • “‘He Who Helps the Guilty, Shares the Crime’? INGOs, Moral Narcissism and Complicity in Wrongdoing” by Pete Buth et al.
  • “Against Proportional Shortfall as a Priority-Setting Principle” by Samuel Altmann
  • “Choice, Pressure and Markets in Kidneys” by Julian Koplin
  • “Deemed Consent: Assessing the New Opt-Out Approach to Organ Procurement in Wales” by Andreas Albertsen
  • “Dangers of Neglecting Non-Financial Conflicts of Interest in Health and Medicine” by Miriam Wiersma, Ian Kerridge, and Wendy Lipworth
  • “Ethical Issues when Modelling Brain Disorders in Non-Human Primates” by Carolyn P Neuhaus

 

The Boys Trapped in the Thailand Cave Could Face an Unusual Disease

July 10, 2018

(ABC News) – As the rescue efforts for the 12 boys and their coach trapped in a flooded Thailand cave have continued, the world has been hoping for the entire group’s safe return to the surface. But after surviving the weather conditions, severe body stresses and unimaginable emotional distress of being trapped for days in dark, wet caverns, the 13 have more challenges ahead. All that time inside the caverns has exposed them to a dangerous and rare infection, often called “cave disease.”

Hormone Therapy Poses Stroke Risk for Transgender Women

July 10, 2018

(Reuters) – Hormones given to people to align their sex with their gender pose a significant risk of serious blood clots and stroke among transgender women, one of the largest studies of transgender patients has concluded. The risk of a dangerous type of blood clot, called a venous thromboembolism, nearly doubles for people transitioning from male to female compared to both non-transgender men and women, researchers reported in Annals of Internal Medicine.

News Organizations Push for Opioid Data to Be Made Public

July 10, 2018

(ABC News) – News organizations are pushing for the public release of data detailing the distribution of prescription opioids throughout the U.S., information that could show how drug manufacturers and distributors contributed to the nation’s addiction and overdose crisis. Attorneys for The Washington Post and HD Media, which owns The Charleston Gazette-Mail in West Virginia, filed requests Monday in federal court in Cleveland. They are advocating for release of records that the federal Drug Enforcement Agency has turned over as part of lawsuits between hundreds of local governments and the drug industry.

Dying Organs Restored to Life in Novel Experiments

July 10, 2018

(New York Times) – Doctors kept her alive with a cumbersome machine that did the work of her heart and lungs. The physicians moved her from Massachusetts General Hospital, where she was born, to Boston Children’s Hospital and decided to try an experimental procedure that had never before been attempted in a human being following a heart attack.  They would take a billion mitochondria — the energy factories found in every cell in the body — from a small plug of Georgia’s healthy muscle and infuse them into the injured muscle of her heart.

The ‘Chicken and Egg’ Reason Why Polio Outbreaks Still Happen

July 10, 2018

(CNN) – If polio is near extinction, why do outbreaks still pop up in places where the disease was thought to be long gone? The answer is complicated. Global efforts to destroy disease-causing polioviruses have been quite a success story. Cases caused by the wild poliovirus have dropped 99% since 1988, thanks to vaccination efforts and a public-private partnership launched that year called the Global Polio Eradication Initiative. Yet some immunization efforts carry the very rare risk of causing polioviruses to circulate in areas where many people might not yet be vaccinated or areas that were poorly vaccinated — an event that could lead to new cases of disease while trying to demolish it.

This Drug Cocktail Reduced Signs of Age-Related Diseases and Extended Life in Mice and Human Cells

July 10, 2018

(Los Angeles Times) – Aging might be perfectly natural. But as practiced by the human body, it is beginning to look more and more like a disease — and a treatable one at that. In a new study, scientists reveal aging to be a process set in motion by the rise of malign forces called senescent cells, which progressively hijack the body and take it on a nightmarish joyride. With advancing age, senescent cells take the wheel, and the human body careens into disease states ranging from cancer and diabetes to arthritis, vision loss and dementia.

The Overlooked Emotions of Sperm Donation

July 10, 2018

(The Atlantic) – There are two well-established ways to go about the process of sperm donation: Prospective parents can use a sperm sample from a friend, acquaintance, or family member (often called a “known” or “directed” donation) or arrange to use a (usually heavily vetted) stranger’s sample through a sperm bank or fertility clinic. Even decades after these practices have become common and their intricacies should theoretically be common knowledge, many of those who opt for sperm donation are still consistently surprised by all the ways it can shape—in some cases straining and, in others, enhancing—family dynamics.

Physicians’ Beliefs May Override Cancer Patients’ Wishes for End-of-Life Care, Study Finds

July 10, 2018

(STAT News) – Keating, also a physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, studies how to deliver high-quality care to patients with cancer. Her latest work examines the factors that contribute to large hospital-by-hospital differences in end-of-life spending for cancer patients. The new study reveals that the variation in the intensity of treatment stems more from the availability of services and physicians’ discomfort navigating end-of-life choices than from patients’ wishes.

A New Edition of JAMA Is Now Available

July 10, 2018

JAMA (vol. 319, no. 18, 2018) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Can Retail Clinics Transform Health Care?” byChristine K. Cassel
  • “Setting Achievable Benchmarks for Value-Based Payments: No Perfect Solution” by David W. Baker and Susan Yendro
  • “Defining Death—Making Sense of the Case of Jahi McMath” by Robert D. Truog
  • “Health Care Employment Growth and the Future of US Cost Containment” by Jonathan Skinner and Amitabh Chandra
  • “Crowdfunding for Unproven Stem Cell–Based Interventions” by Jeremy Snyder, Leigh Turner, and Valorie A. Crooks

 

A New Edition of Medical Law Review Is Now Available

July 10, 2018

Medical Law Review (vol. 26, no. 2, 2018) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “The Emergence and Development of Bioethics in the UK” by Ruth Chadwick and Duncan Wilson
  • “The Transmutation of Deference in Medicine: An Ethico-Legal Perspective” by Sarah Devaney and Søren Holm
  • “On the Relationship between Medical Ethics and the Law” by Iain Brassington
  • “New Legal Landscapes: (Re)Constructing the Boundaries of Mental Capacity Law” by Beverley A Clough
  • “Everyday Cyborgs: On Integrated Persons and Integrated Goods” by Muireann Quigley and Semande Ayihongbe
  • “Legally Human? ‘Novel Beings’ and English Law” by David R Lawrence and Margaret Brazier

 

A New Edition of Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine Is Now Available

July 10, 2018

Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine (vol. 111, no. 5, 2018) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Devolved Regional Health Services” by Michael Rigby
  • “The Impact of Private Online Video Consulting in Primary Care” by Louis Peters, Geva Greenfield, Azeem Majeed, and Benedict Hayhoe

 

A New Edition of Science, Technology and Society Is Now Available

July 10, 2018

Science, Technology and Society (vol. 23, no. 2, 2018) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Turning Ethics into Institutions: The Techno-politics of Human Research Regulation in Taiwan” by Wen-Hua Kuo

 

A New Edition of Journal of Applied Philosophy Is Now Available

July 10, 2018

Journal of Applied Philosophy (vol. 35, no. 2, 2018) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Rose’s Prevention Paradox” by Christopher Thompson
  • “Selecting Against Disability: The Liberal Eugenic Challenge and the Argument from Cognitive Diversity” by Christopher Gyngell and Thomas Douglas
  • “What’s So Bad About Killer Robots?” by Alex Leveringhaus
  • “Mandatory Vaccination: An Unqualified Defence” by Roland Pierik

 

State Departments Fail to Offer Cure to 144,000 Inmates with Deadly Hepatitis C

July 9, 2018

(Kaiser Health News) – State prisons across the U.S. are failing to treat at least 144,000 inmates who have hepatitis C, a curable but potentially fatal liver disease, according to a recent survey and subsequent interviews of state corrections departments. Many of the 49 states that responded to questions about inmates with hepatitis C cited high drug prices as the reason for denying treatment. The drugs can cost up to $90,000 for a course of treatment.

From Gene-Editing Cures to Bioweapon Nightmare

July 9, 2018

(Bloomberg) – More worrying is what Crispr and related new biotechnologies might do for the engineering of new bioweapons. A report by a committee of the National Academy of Sciences suggests that finding effective countermeasures won’t be easy, and details a list of hair-raising possibilities for how the new technology could turn our biological machinery against us.

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