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Black Babies Born Premature Get Worse Health Care Than Other Races

March 26, 2019

(UPI) – Black newborns are receiving poor healthcare and segregation may be to blame, a new study says. Premature babies born to black women have a higher risk of receiving poor prenatal care than white, Asian-American and Hispanic babies, according to a study published Monday in JAMA Pediatrics.

Google Glass Helps Kids with Autism Read Facial Expressions

March 26, 2019

(Reuters) – Children with autism may have an easier time reading facial expressions and navigating social interactions when they use Google Glass paired with a smartphone app, a small experiment suggests. The system, dubbed “Superpower Glass,” helps them decipher what’s happening with people around them, researchers found.

A New Edition of Maternal and Child Health Journal Is Now Available

March 26, 2019

Maternal and Child Health Journal (vol. 22, no. 12, 2018) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Progress Toward Eliminating Mother to Child Transmission of HIV in Kenya: Review of Treatment Guidelines Uptake and Pediatric Transmission Between 2013 and 2016—A Follow Up” by Ruby Angeline Pricilla et al.
  • “Could Postnatal Women’s Groups Be Used to Improve Outcomes for Mothers and Children in High-Income Countries? A Systematic Review” by Catherine Sikorski et al.
  • “Socioeconomic Position and Reproduction: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health” by N. Holowko, M. Jones, L. Tooth, I. Koupil, and G. D. Mishra
  • “Improving Rates of Early Entry Prenatal Care in an Underserved Population” by Jaimin S. Shah, F. Lee Revere, and Eugene C. Toy
  • “Completeness of a Maternal and Perinatal Mortality Enhanced Surveillance System in Pakistan: Evidence from Capture–Recapture Methods” by Jasim Anwar, Siranda Torvaldsen, Mohamud Sheikh, and Richard Taylor
  • “The Relationship Between the Patient-Centered Medical Homes, Healthcare Expenditures, and Quality of Care Among Children with Special Health Care Needs” by Chia-Wei Lin, John A. Romley, and Caroline Carlin
  • “Can a Call Make a Difference? Measured Change in Women’s Breastfeeding Self-efficacy Across Call Interactions on a Telephone Helpline” by Karen Thorpe, Elena Jansen, Cerdiwen Cromack, and Danielle Gallegos
  • “Ohio’s Medicaid Expansion and Unmet Health Needs Among Low-Income Women of Reproductive Age” by Thalia P. Farietta, Bo Lu, and Rachel Tumin
  • “Examining the Association Between Maternal Smoking During Pregnancy and Child Behavior Problems Using Quality-Adjusted Life Years” by John D. Hartman and Benjamin M. Craig
  • “Evaluation of Training Program for the Maternal and Child Health Workforce at Tulane University” by Amelia J. Brandt, Bert R. Cramer, Shokufeh M. Ramirez, and Carolyn Johnson
  • “Enhancing Healthier Birth Outcomes by Creating Supportive Spaces for Pregnant African American Women Living in Milwaukee” by Lucy Mkandawire-Valhmu et al.
  • “Body Image Dissatisfaction, Obesity and Their Associations with Breastfeeding in Mexican Women, a Cross-Sectional Study” by Galya Bigman, Anna V. Wilkinson, Nuria Homedes, and Adriana Pérez
  • “The Effect of Mass Evacuation on Infant Feeding: The Case of the 2016 Fort McMurray Wildfire” by Sarah E. DeYoung, Jodine Chase, Michelle Pensa Branco, and Benjamin Park

A New Edition of Occupational Medicine Is Now Available

March 26, 2019

Occupational Medicine (vol. 68, no. 8, 2018) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Severe Learning Disabilities and Consent” by Anli Yue Zhou, Jacques Tamin, Susan Turner, and Donald Menzies
  • “Fatigue Risk Management Systems Needed in Healthcare” by Peter Noone and Eugene Waclawski

A New Edition of Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine Is Now Available

March 26, 2019

Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine (vol. 111, no. 11, 2018) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Technology: A Help or Hindrance to Empathic Healthcare?” by L Pealing, HV Tempest, J Howick, and H Dambha-Miller
  • “Euthanasia and Assisted Dying: What Is the Current Position and what Are the Key Arguments Informing the Debate?” by Andreas Fontalis, Efthymia Prousali, and Kunal Kulkarni
  • “An Evaluation of a Safety Improvement Intervention in Care Homes in England: A Participatory Qualitative Study” by Martin Marshall et al.

A New Edition of Journal of Applied Philosophy Is Now Available

March 26, 2019

Journal of Applied Philosophy (vol. 35, no. 4, 2018) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “The Taste Question in Animal Ethics” by Jean Kazez
  • “No Such Thing as Killer Robots” by Michael Robillard
  • “Ageing and Terminal Illness: Problems for Rawlsian Justice” by Ben Davies
  • “The Challenge of Authenticity: Enhancement and Accurate Self?Presentation” by Adam Kadlac
  • “The Devout and the Disabled: Religious and Cultural Accommodation?as?Human?Variation” by Miklos I. Zala
  • “Forgetting in Immortality” by Ryan Marshall Felder

A New Edition of Clinical Ethics Is Now Available

March 26, 2019

Clinical Ethics (vol. 13, no. 4, 2018) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Ambiguity, Death Determination, and the Dead Donor Rule” by Will Lyon
  • “The Zone of Parental Discretion and the Complexity of Paediatrics: A Response to Alderson” by Rosalind McDougall, Lynn Gillam, Merle Spriggs, and Clare Delany
  • “Physicians’ Communication Patterns for Motivating Rectal Cancer Patients to Biomarker Research: Empirical Insights and Ethical Issues” by Sabine Wöhlke, Julia Perry, and Silke Schicktanz
  • “An Evaluation of Reporting of Consent Declines in Three High Impact Factor Journals” by B. H. Figer et al.
  • “Ethical Issues in Genomic Research: Proposing Guiding Principles Co-Produced with Stakeholders” by D. Carrieri et al.
  • “General Practitioners’ Ethical Decision-Making: Does Being a Patient Themselves Make a Difference?” by Katherine Helen Hall, Jessica Michael, Chrystal Jaye, and Jessica Young
  • “Physicians and Caregivers Do Differ in Ethical Attitudes to Daily Clinical Practice” by Patrik Kjærsdam Telléus, Dorte Møller Holdgaard, and Birthe Thørring

Silicon Valley Techies Are Turning to a Cheap Diabetes Drug to Help Them Live Longer

March 25, 2019

(CNBC) – Ariel Poler is a veteran angel investor who spends his days traveling around the Bay Area to meet with entrepreneurs. Now in his early fifties, he also thinks a lot more about his own health, so he makes an effort to keep his stress levels low by eating well and taking regular kite-surfing trips. But he also takes a tiny, white pill called metformin, which is prescribed to millions of people with diabetes to help control high blood sugar. Poler does not have diabetes, but he takes it for a different reason. He hopes that it will help keep him healthier for longer.

How Pope Francis Could Shape the Future of Robotics

March 25, 2019

(BBC) – It might not be the first place you imagine when you think about robots. But in the Renaissance splendour of the Vatican, thousands of miles from Silicon Valley, scientists, ethicists and theologians gather to discuss the future of robotics. The ideas go to the heart of what it means to be human and could define future generations on the planet. The workshop, Roboethics: Humans, Machines and Health was hosted by The Pontifical Academy for Life.

Mississippi’s New ‘Heartbeat’ Law Bans Most Abortions at 6 Weeks

March 25, 2019

(NBC News) – Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant on Thursday signed one of the strictest abortion laws in the nation — a measure that bans most abortions once a fetal heartbeat can be detected, about six weeks into pregnancy. The New York-based Center for Reproductive Rights called the measure “cruel and clearly unconstitutional” and said it would sue Mississippi to try to block the law from taking effect on July 1. Bryant’s action came despite a federal judge’s decision last year striking down a less-restrictive law limiting abortions in the state.

Controversial ‘Abortion Reversal’ Regimen Is Put to the Test

March 25, 2019

(NPR) – Dr. Mitchell Creinin never expected to be in the position of investigating a treatment he doesn’t think works. And yet, Creinin will be spending the next year or so using a research grant from the Society of Family Planning to put to the test a treatment he sees as dubious — one that recently has gained traction, mostly via the Internet, among groups that oppose abortion. They call it “abortion pill reversal.”

Machine Treating Patients? It’s Already Happening

March 25, 2019

(TIME) – Mabu is among the latest examples of what machine learning, or artificial intelligence (AI), can accomplish in medicine. The questions she asks come from a recipe that combines best practices that doctors use to monitor heart-failure patients like Byrd with data from how physicians interact with patients — the questions they ask as well as how they respond — to isolate and manage not just medical symptoms but psychological barriers like anxiety and depression that often make dealing with chronic diseases difficult. She is also designed to not just spit out the same questions every day, but to change her lineup depending on Byrd’s answers.

A New Edition of The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy Is Now Available

March 25, 2019

The Journal of Medicine & Philosophy (vol. 43, no. 6, 2018) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Bioethics After the Death of God” by Mark J Cherry
  • “Engelhardt’s Diagnosis and Prescription: Persuasive or Problematic?” by B. Andrew Lustig
  • “God as the Good: A Critique of H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr.’s After God” by David Bradshaw
  • “The Future of Roman Catholic Bioethics” by Christopher Tollefsen
  • “Grounding Moral Authority in Spirit” by Griffin Trotter
  • “Brief Remarks on Engelhardt’s After God” by Maurizio Mori
  • “Committing to Priorities: Incompleteness in Macro-Level Health Care Allocation and Its Implications” by Anders Herlitz

A New Edition of Research Ethics is Now Available

March 25, 2019

Research Ethics (vol. 14, no. 3, 2018) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Overcoming Ethical Barriers to Research” by Helen E Machin and Steven M. Shardlow
  • “Research Governance Review of a Negligible-Risk Research Project: Too Much of a Good Thing?” by Amanda Rush et al.
  • “Research Ethics, Informed Consent and the Disempowerment of First Nation Peoples” by Juan M. Tauri
  • Freedom as Non-Domination in Behavioral and Biomedical Research” by Aidan Kestigian
  • “One Size Fits Not Quite All: Universal Research Ethics with Diversity” by Mohamed S. Msoroka and Diana Amundsen

A New Edition of JAMA Is Now Available

March 25, 2019

JAMA (vol. 320, no. 19, 2018) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Physical Activity Guidelines for Health and Prosperity in the United States” by Brett P. Giroir and Don Wright
  • “The New Age of Patient Autonomy: Implications for the Patient-Physician Relationship” by Madison K. Kilbride and Steven Joffe
  • “Health Apps and Health Policy: What Is Needed?” by David W. Bates, Adam Landman, and David M. Levine
  • “Alternative State-Level Financing for Hepatitis C Treatment—The “Netflix Model” by Mark R. Trusheim, William M. Cassidy, and Peter B. Bach
  • “Solving the Silence” by Olivia J. Killeen and Laura Bridges
  • “Reducing the Stress on Clinicians Working in the ICU” by Jennifer B. Seaman, Taya R. Cohen, and Douglas B. White
  • “Scientific Misconduct and Medical Journals” by Howard Bauchner et al.
  • “FDA Joins New Effort to Strengthen Medical Device Cybersecurity” by Rebecca Voelker


A New Edition of Medical Law International Is Now Available

March 25, 2019

Medical Law International (vol. 18, no. 1, 2018) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Rethinking Necessity and Best Interests in New Zealand Mental Capacity Law” by Alison Douglass
  • The Regulation of Stem Cell Research in Ireland: From the Commission on Assisted Human Reproduction to the Assisted Human Reproduction Bill 2017″ by Ciara Staunton

A New Edition of Research Ethics is Now Available

March 25, 2019

Research Ethics (vol. 14, no. 2, 2018) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Faking Participant Identity: Vested Interests and Purposeful Interference” by Patricia Fronek and Lynne Briggs
  • “(De)constructing Ethical Research Narratives in Criminological Research” by Ian Mahoney and Tony Kearon
  • “Pragmatic Clinical Trials and the Consent Process” by Blake Murdoch and Timothy Caulfield
  • “Decolonizing Both Researcher and Research and Its Effectiveness in Indigenous Research” by Ranjan Datta
  • “Mining Social Media Data: How Are Research Sponsors and Researchers Addressing the Ethical Challenges?” by Joanna Taylor and Claudia Pagliari

China’s Birth Rates Fall in Several Regions in 2018: China Daily

March 22, 2019

(Reuters) – China’s birth rate in several regions, including the capital Beijing, fell again in 2018, the official China Daily said on Friday, despite government efforts to encourage couples to have more children. Alarmed by the rapid aging of its population, China relaxed its controversial “one-child policy” in 2016, allowing all couples to have two children instead of just one. The change has failed to reverse what demographers say is a long-term trend of falling birth rates fueled by growing prosperity and concerns about the high cost of raising children.

Electronic Health Records Cannot Replace a Doctor Who Knows You

March 22, 2019

(The Conversation) – More recently, we and many other doctors have realized that EHRs are no panacea, or cure-all. They are expensive; one study showed for a five-doctor group, the cost is $162,000 to install and $85,000 per year to maintain. These systems force doctors to follow generic templates that may not reflect the needs of a particular patient.
In addition, health professionals often find themselves spending more time and energy tending to the EHR than to their patient. One study at Dartmouth showed that physicians spend two hours on the EHR for every hour they spend with patients.

Revolutions: The Incredible Potential of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

March 22, 2019

(New Atlas) – Thirteen years on, Yamanaka has earned a Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his discovery (jointly award to him and Sir John B. Gurdon in 2012), and scientists have built on his work and tweaked his recipes to bring about some truly exciting advances. While iPSCs are a versatile scientific tool that are also proving useful in modeling disease and screening drugs, here we focus on their huge promise in the field of regenerative medicine.

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