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In Medical Emergencies, Can Doctors Keep Patients’ Families in the Dark about Treatment Procedures?

February 14, 2017

(Scroll.in) – Dr Fouziya Shersad struggled to control her grief while describing her ordeal at the Dr Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital in New Delhi last week where her father, veteran politician E Ahamed had been taken after suffering a massive heart attack. Ahamed had collapsed on the floor of Parliament on January 31 at 11.30 am when President Pranab Mukherjee was addressing its joint session and was immediately taken to the hospital and was put on life support system at the trauma care Intensive Care Unit. Dr Shersad, and her husband Babu Shersad are both doctors. They alleged that the way the family of the patient was treated goes against medical ethics.

Doctors Allege Illegal Organ Trade on the Rise in Major Hospitals Too

February 14, 2017

(Times of India) – Stating that the illegal organ donation is now finding its way into bigger hospitals as well, a panel of experts, comprising of doctors and activists was of the opinion that laws regulating organ donations need to be amended along with strict implementation.

Sharp Rise Reported in Older Americans’ Use of Multiple Psychotropic Drugs

February 14, 2017

(New York Times) – The number of retirement-age Americans taking at least three psychiatric drugs more than doubled between 2004 and 2013, even though almost half of them had no mental health diagnosis on record, researchers reported on Monday. The new analysis, based on data from doctors’ office visits, suggests that inappropriate prescribing to older people is more common than previously thought. Office visits are a close, if not exact, estimate of underlying patient numbers. The paper appears in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine.

He Vowed to Cure Cancer. But This Billionaire’s Moonshot Is Falling Far Short of the Hype

February 14, 2017

(STAT News) – But a STAT investigation of Soon-Shiong’s cancer moonshot has found very little scientific progress. At its core, the initiative appears to be an elaborate marketing tool for Soon-Shiong — a way to promote his pricey new cancer diagnostic tool at a time when he badly needs a business success, as his publicly-traded companies are losing tens of millions per quarter. STAT also found several instances of inflated claims, with the moonshot team taking credit for progress that doesn’t appear to be real. Soon-Shiong’s use of the moonshot to advance his business interests may be good for his investors. But it also increasingly looks destined to disappoint patients — the latest in a long trail of failed quests to win the war on cancer.

A New Edition of The American Journal of Bioethics Is Now Available

February 14, 2017

The American Journal of Bioethics (vol. 17, no. 1, 2017) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “A Framework for Unrestricted Prenatal Whole-Genome Sequencing: Respecting and Enhancing the Autonomy of Prospective Parents” by Stephanie C. Chen and David T. Wasserman
  • “Tracking U.S. Professional Athletes: The Ethics of Biometric Technologies” by Katrina Karkazis and Jennifer R. Fishman

 

A New Edition of The Linacre Quarterly Is Now Available

February 14, 2017

The Linacre Quarterly (vol. 83, no. 4, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Catholic Social Teaching: Precepts for Healthcare Reform” by Donald P. Condit
  • ” Healthcare Reform” by James C. Capretta
  • “Of Means and Ends: The Financialization and Regulation of Health Care” by Andreas Widmer
  • ” Restoring Christ-Centered Medicine Through Public Policy Changes Centered Around Subsidiarity and the Doctor–Patient Relationship” by Charles A. Donovan and Grace-Marie Turner
  • “Health Care’s Ills: A Catholic Diagnosis” by Angus Sibley
  • “Achieving Moral, High Quality, Affordable Medical Care in America Through a True Free Market” by David McKalip

 

A New Edition of NanoEthics Is Now Available

February 14, 2017

NanoEthics (vol. 10, no. 3, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “A Lay Ethics Quest for Technological Futures: About Tradition, Narrative and Decision-Making” by Simone van der Burg
  • “Contrasting Medical Technology with Deprivation and Social Vulnerability. Lessons for the Ethical Debate on Cloning and Organ Transplantation Through the Film Never Let Me Go (2010)” by Solveig Lena Hansen and Sabine Wöhlke
  • “Enrolling the Toggle Switch: Visionary Claims and the Capability of Modeling Objects in the Disciplinary Formation of Synthetic Biology” by Clemens Blümel
  • “Exploring Political Views on Synthetic Biology in the Netherlands” by Virgil Rerimassie
  • “An Update of Public Perceptions of Synthetic Biology: Still Undecided?” by Mirko Ancillotti et al.
  • “Misconceptions of Synthetic Biology: Lessons from an Interdisciplinary Summer School” by Cyprien Verseux et al.

 

A New Edition of Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine Is Now Available

February 14, 2017

Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine (vol. 109, no. 12, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Population Healthcare: A New Clinical Responsibility” by Muir Gray
  • “Empathy, Sympathy and Compassion in Healthcare: Is There a Problem? Is There a Difference? Does it Matter?” by David Jeffrey

 

A New Edition of Journal of Law and the Biosciences Is Now Available

February 14, 2017

Journal of Law and the Biosciences (vol. 3, no. 3, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Public Attitudes Toward Legally Coerced Biological Treatments of Criminals” by Colleen M. Berryessa, Jennifer A. Chandler, and Peter Reiner
  • “Sperm Donor Anonymity and Compensation: An Experiment with American Sperm Donors” by Glenn Cohen, Travis Coan, Michelle Ottey, and Christina Boyd
  • “Postnatal Human Genetic Enhancement and the Parens Patriae Doctrine” by Sivan Tamir
  • “Redefining Responsible Research and Innovation for the Advancement of Biobanking and Biomedical Research” by Helen Yu

 

Should Healthcare Professionals Sometimes Allow Harm? The Case of Self-Injury

February 13, 2017

(British Medical Journal) – This paper considers the ethical justification for the use of harm minimisation approaches with individuals who self-injure. While the general issues concerning harm minimisation have been widely debated, there has been only limited consideration of the ethical issues raised by allowing people to continue injuring themselves as part of an agreed therapeutic programme. I will argue that harm minimisation should be supported on the basis that it results in an overall reduction in harm when compared with more traditional ways of dealing with self-injurious behaviour. It will be argued that this is an example of a situation where healthcare professionals sometimes have a moral obligation to allow harm to come to their patients.

Surrogacy Booming in Australia Despite Legal Issues

February 13, 2017

(Australia Broadcasting Co.) – Fertility professionals and advocacy groups say surrogacy is experiencing a quiet boom in Australia after several Asian countries banned foreigners from paying women to carry babies for them. Dr Glenn Stirling, the medical director of Brisbane IVF clinic Life Fertility, says the number of patients they see has risen dramatically, and that new patients arrive almost daily.

Docs Bill Medicare for End-of-Life Advice as ‘Death Panel’ Fears Reemerge

February 13, 2017

(USA Today) – End-of-life counseling sessions, once decried by some conservative Republicans as “death panels,” gained steam among Medicare patients in 2016, the first year doctors could charge the federal program for the service. Nearly 14,000 providers billed almost $35 million — including nearly $16 million paid by Medicare — for advance care planning conversations for about 223,000 patients from January through June, according to data released this week by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.

Biotech Will Let Us Give Our Brains a Makeover–But We Risk Becoming Less Human in the Process

February 13, 2017

(Quartz) – Anyone who speaks in this manner has crossed an invisible but critically important line. They are treating human beings as if they are commodities that can be assessed, measured and exchanged. In this view, humanity becomes a kind of “platform”—akin to a piece of software or an operating system, whose performance can be boosted, built upon and manipulated at will. Personality traits become “features”; hard-earned skills and talents become “assets”; deep-seated personal struggles and failings become “liabilities.” Confronting this tendency toward the commodification of persons, and counteracting it with effective cultural strategies for “re-humanization,” will pose one of the most important moral challenges of our time.

Eugenics and the Outer Limits of Good Breeding

February 13, 2017

(Irish Times) – Eugenics, a science popular in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, aimed to encourage governments to favour the reproduction of the most “fit” members of society and to reduce or even prevent the reproduction of those considered less fit. My students immediately hone in on the injustice of self-selected individuals deciding what constitutes fitness to reproduce. I use the example of eugenics because it shocks them into understanding that science and medicine are not neutral and can be used to forward social agendas.

A New Edition of Nursing Philosophy Is Now Available

February 13, 2017

Nursing Philosophy (vol. 18, no. 1, 2017) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Good Relations with Technology: Empirical Ethics and Aesthetics in Care” by Jeannette Pols
  • “Mediating Patienthood—From an Athics of to an Ethics with Technology” by Asle H. Kiran
  • “Situated Technology in Reproductive Health Care: Do We Need a New Theory of the Subject to Promote Person-Centred Care?” by Biljana Stankovic
  • “Simulated Human Patients and Patient-Centredness: The Uncanny Hybridity of Nursing Education, Technology, and Learning to Care” by Aileen V. Ireland

 

A New Edition of The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy Is Now Available

February 13, 2017

The Journal of Medicine & Philosophy (vol. 42, no. 1, 2017) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Philosophical Provocation: The Lifeblood of Clinical Ethics” by Laurence B. McCullough
  • “The Ethics of Clinical Care and the Ethics of Clinical Research: Yin and Yang” by Charles J. Kowalski, Raymond J. Hutchinson, and Adam J. Mrdjenovich
  • “Sound Trust and the Ethics of Telecare” by Sander A. Voerman and Philip J. Nickel
  • “Sex Reassignment Surgery and Enhancement” by Tomislav Bracanovi?

 

A New Edition of The Journal of Rural Health Is Now Available

February 13, 2017

The Journal of Rural Health (vol. 33, no. 1, 2017) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Long-Term Trends in Black and White Mortality in the Rural United States: Evidence of a Race-Specific Rural Mortality Penalty” by Wesley James and Jeralynn S. Cossman
  • “Mental Health First Aid in Rural Communities: Appropriateness and Outcomes” by Jean A. Talbot, Erika C. Ziller, and Donald A. Szlosek
  • “Assessing Differences in the Availability of Opioid Addiction Therapy Options: Rural Versus Urban and American Indian Reservation Versus Nonreservation” by Katherine A. Hirchak and Sean M. Murphy

 

A New Edition of South African Journal of Bioethics and Law is Now Available

February 13, 2017

South African Journal of Bioethics and Law (vol. 9, no. 2, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Harm to Patients and Others Caused by Impaired Junior Doctors Compelled to Work 30-Hour Shifts or Longer: Can the Minister of Health, Provincial Mecs for Health and Public Health Officials Be Held Liable?” by David Jan Mcquoid-Mason
  • “Reproductive Autonomy: A Case Study” By David R Hall and Anton A van Niekerk
  • “Knowledge and Attitude of Postgraduate Students in Kenya on Ethics in Mental Health Research” by Beatrice Amagune and G C Verster
  • “What Changes Are There in Decisions by the Wits Human Research Ethics Committee (Medical) and in Process Errors by Research Applicants Between 2003 and 2015?” by Peter Cleaton-Jones
  • “The Right to Physical Integrity and Informed Refusal: Just How Far Does a Patient’s Right to Refuse Medical Treatment Go?” by Annelize Nienaber and Kristen Nicole Bailey
  • “A Critical Review of Health Research Ethical Guidelines Regarding Caregiver Consent for HIV Research Involving Minors in South Africa: Ethical and Legal Issues” by Eshetu Bekle Worku, Arlene M Davis, and Brenda Morrow

 

A New Edition of The New England Journal of Medicine Is Now Available

February 13, 2017

The New England Journal of Medicine (vol. 376, no. 4, 2017) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Repealing the ACA without a Replacement — The Risks to American Health Care” by B.H. Obama
  • “Allocating Organs to Cognitively Impaired Patients” by S.D. Halpern and D. Goldberg
  • “Intimate Choices, Public Threats — Reproductive and LGBTQ Rights under a Trump Administration” by M. Murray

 

Pharmacies Thrive Selling Opioids for Depressed Small Town Pain

February 10, 2017

(Kaiser Health News) – This economically depressed city in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains is an image of frozen-in-time decline: empty storefronts with faded facades, sagging power lines and aged streets with few stoplights. But there is one type of business that seems to thrive: pharmacies. Eleven drug stores, mostly independents, are scattered about a tiny city of 1,500 people. Many have opened in the past decade — four in the past three years. And prescription pain drugs are one of the best-selling items — the very best seller at some.

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