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A New Edition of Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics Is Now Available

July 22, 2016

Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics (vol. 37, no. 3, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “The Value of Dignity in and for Bioethics: Rethinking the Terms of the Debate” by Clair Morrissey
  • “When Clinical Care is Like Research: The Need for Review and Consent” by David Wendler and Rebecca Johnson
  • “Inference to the Best Explanation and Mechanisms in Medicine” by Stefan Dragulinescu

 

Apple’s Health Experiment Is Riddled with Privacy Problems

July 21, 2016

(Gizmodo) – Pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) has partnered with Apple on a new clinical study on rheumatoid arthritis. The study relies on an iPhone app to collect data about arthritic symptoms from users as they go about their daily lives. That sounds great at first glance, but how well will it protect your privacy?

Study: Influence of Genetics on Mental Health Depends on Environment

July 21, 2016

(The Scientist) – The same genes could make a person feel happy or depressed, depending on their environment. Combining research on genetics and cognitive biases—our mental “filters” for interpreting the world—will contribute to a greater understanding of mental disorders and could lead to improved therapies, Elaine Fox of University of Oxford and Chris Beevers of the University of Texas at Austin suggest in a perspective published yesterday (July 19) in Molecular Psychiatry.

HHS: HIPAA Limited in Age of mHealth, Social Media and Wearables

July 21, 2016

(Healthcare ITNews) – “The health information marketplace of 2016 is filled with technology that enables individuals to be more engaged in managing their own health outside of the traditional healthcare sphere than ever before,” according to the 32-page report. “The wearable fitness trackers, social media sites where individuals share health information through specific social networks, and other technologies that are common today did not exist when Congress enacted the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996.”

Updated HPV Vaccine Guideline

July 21, 2016

(Managed Care Magazine) – The American Cancer Society (ACS) has endorsed human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), the principal source of guidance on U.S. immunization policy. An updated guideline from the ACS supports the ACIP recommendation to vaccinate males as well as females at ages 11 to 12 to protect against HPV infection, which is associated not only with cervical cancers, but also with penile, anal, oropharyngeal, and other cancers.

Physician-Assisted Suicide, Euthanasia: Increasingly Legal But Still Rare

July 21, 2016

(Reuters) – Legalized euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide are mainly used by patients with cancer, but remain rare, according to a new analysis of such programs. In the last year alone, California has legalized physician-assisted suicide, Canada legalized both physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia, and Colombia performed its first legal euthanasia, said John Urwin, a study author from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. “In order to inform current debates, it’s imperative to understand current laws and practices.”

Gene Therapy Trial Wrenches Families as One Child’s Death Saves Another

July 21, 2016

(MIT Technology Review) – The study, at the San Raffaele Telethon Institute for Gene Therapy, is proving dramatically effective in stopping metachromatic leukodystrophy, or MLD, an inherited disorder that strikes in childhood and destroys the brain’s white matter, leading to paralysis and dementia. The therapy involves adding a correct copy of a single gene to a child’s bone marrow. But it only works well if it’s given before symptoms develop: by the time most children, including Liviana, are diagnosed it’s too late. The exception is when a family is alerted by one sick child that others are at risk. Then genetic and biochemical tests can discover if there’s a disease threat in younger children.

A New Edition of Human Reproduction Update is Available

July 21, 2016

Human Reproduction Update (vol. 22, no. 4, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Genome Engineering Through CRISPR/Cas9 Technology in the Human Germline and Pluripotent Stem Cells” byR. Vassena, B. Heindryckx, R. Peco, G. Pennings, A. Raya, K. Sermon, and A. Veiga
  • “Oocyte Cryopreservation: Where are We Now?” by Catrin E. Argyle, Joyce C. Harper, and Melanie C. Davies
  • “Investigating Psychosocial Attitudes, Motivations and Experiences of Oocyte Donors, Recipients and Egg Sharers: A Systematic Review” by Timothy Bracewell-Milnes, Srdjan Saso, Shabana Bora, Alaa M. Ismail, Maya Al-Memar, Ali Hasan Hamed, Hossam Abdalla, and Meen-Yau Thum

 

A New Edition of JAMA Internal Medicine Is Now Available

July 21, 2016

JAMA Internal Medicine (vol. 176, no. 6, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “How Patent Troll Legislation Can Increase Timely Access to Generic Drugs” by Carolyn L. Treasure and Aaron S. Kesselheim
  • “To Cure Sometimes, to Relieve Often, to Comfort Always” by Andre Kumar and Nazima Allaudeen
  • “Promise and Peril for Generic Drugs” by Joshua M. Sharfstein and Jeremy Greene

 

A New Edition of The Linacre Quarterly Is Now Available

July 21, 2016

The Linacre Quarterly (vol. 83, no. 2, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Frailty and Old Age” by Patrick Guinan
  • “Suffering, Death, and Eternal Life” by Fr. James McTavish
  • “How Western Medicine Lost Its Soul” by Michel Accad
  • “Physicians’ Role in the Debate on Polarizing Medical Topics” by Luigi Adamo
  • “A Virtue Analysis of Recreational Marijuana Use” by Ezra Sullivan & Nicanor Austriaco
  • “Adverse Effects of Marijuana Use” by Kathleen E. Feeney & Kyle M. Kampman
  • “Ethical Aspects of Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA Transfer” by José Rafael Blesa, Julio Tudela & Justo Aznar
  • “A Philosophical Assessment of TK’s Autopsy Report: Implications for the Debate Over the Brain Death Criteria” by Nicanor Pier Giorgio Austriaco O.P.
  • “Beyond the Abortion Wars: A Way Forward for a New Generation” by Paul Flaman

 

A New Edition of Nursing Science Quarterly is Now Available

July 21, 2016

Nursing Science Quarterly (vol. 29, no. 3, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Power Relations: Their Embodiment in Research” by Kristine L. Florczak
  • “Ancient Ethical Practices of Dualism and Ethical Implications for Future Paradigms in Nursing” by Constance L. Milton
  • “Epistemic Authority in Nursing Practice vs. Doctors’ Orders” by Pamela G. Reed

 

A New Edition of Medical Law Review Is Now Available

July 21, 2016

Medical Law Review (vol. 24, no. 2, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Converting the ‘Right to Life’ to the ‘Right to Physician-Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia’: An Analysis of Carter v Canada (Attorney General), Supreme Court of Canada” by Benny Chan and Margaret Somerville
  • “What are ‘Best Interests’? A Critical Evaluation of ‘Best Interests’ Decision-Making in Clinical Practice” by Helen J. Taylor
  • “Breaching the Sexual Boundaries in the Doctor-Patient Relationship: Should English Law Recognise Fiduciary Duties?” by Suzanne Ost
  • “A Shocking Requirement in the Law on Negligence Liability for Psychiatric Illness: Liverpool Women’s Hospital NHS Foundation Trust v Ronayne [2015] EWCA CIV 588” by Andrew S. Burrows and John H. Burrows

 

In Research World, Long-Term Injury Care Hard to Come By

July 20, 2016

(U.S. News & World Report) – Fox isn’t the only research sponsor that doesn’t provide a long-term safety net for injured trial volunteers. In fact, according to a study published in the journal IRB: Ethics & Human Research, an analysis of policies held by top research institutions in the U.S. found that only two of 169 provided any compensation for research-related injuries in 2012 beyond immediate medical care.

For Teen Girls, Abortion Linked to Better Outcomes vs. Giving Birth

July 20, 2016

(Reuters) – Compared to teen mothers, girls who have an abortion before age 18 have no negative effects that carry into early adulthood, a nationwide study in Finland suggests. Girls who had underage abortions tended to have higher educational attainment and were less likely to be dependent on welfare at age 25 compared to the girls who gave birth, the study team found.

Prisons Around the World Are Reservoirs of Infectious Disease

July 20, 2016

(The Washington Post) – Prisoners around the world and people who were formerly incarcerated have a higher burden of HIV and other infectious diseases than the general population, worsening the spread of diseases inside and outside of prison, according to new research. In a series of six papers in medical journal the Lancet, researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health analyzed the prevalence of infectious diseases including HIV, hepatitis C, hepatitis B and tuberculosis between 2005 and 2015.

A New Edition of Nursing Ethics Is Now Available

July 20, 2016

Nursing Ethics (vol. 23, no. 4, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Robots in Elder Care: Some Ethical Questions” by Ann Gallagher, Dagfinn Nåden, and Dag Karterud
  • “Ethical Competence: A Concept Analysis” by Kati Kulju, Minna Stolt, Riitta Suhonen, and Helena Leino-Kilpi
  • “Towards a Competency Assessment Tool for Nurses in Ethics Meetings” by Bart Cusveller and Annemiek Schep-Akkerman
  • “Clarifying Perspectives: Ethics Case Reflection Sessions in Childhood Cancer Care” by Cecilia Bartholdson, Kim Lützén, Klas Blomgren, and Pernilla Pergert
  • “Ethical Dilemmas Facing Chief Nurses in Japan: A Pilot Study” by Chiharu Ito and Mikiko Natsume
  • “Confidentiality in Participatory Research: Challenges from One Study” by Elmira Petrova, Jan Dewing, and Michelle Camilleri
  • “Qualitative Research Ethics on the Spot: Not Only on the Desktop” by Christine Øye, Nelli Øvre Sørensen, and Stinne Glasdam
  • “Iranian Women and Care Providers’ Perceptions of Equitable Prenatal Care: A Qualitative Study” by Mahin Gheibizadeh, Heidar Ali Abedi, Easa Mohammadi, and Parvin Abedi

 

A New Edition of Bioethics Is Now Available

July 20, 2016

Bioethics (vol. 30, no. 6, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “The Biodefense Field” by Emilio Mordini
  • “Enhancing Beyond What Ought to be the Case – A Conceptual Clarification” by Raphael Van Riel
  • “The Epistemology of Moral Bioenhancement” by Parker Crutchfield
  • “A Personalist Ontological Approach to Synthetic Biology” by Lucía Gómez-Tatay, José Miguel Hernández-Andreu and Justo Aznar
  • “Are Open-Label Placebos Ethical? Informed Consent and Ethical Equivocations” by Charlotte Blease, Luana Colloca and Ted J. Kaptchuk
  • “Should Deceased Donation be Morally Preferred in Uterine Transplantation Trials?” by Nicola Williams
  • “Protecting Future Children from In-Utero Harm” by Dominic Wilkinson, Loane Skene, Lachlan De crespigny and Julian Savulescu
  • “Emergency Contraceptives and the Beginning of Human Animals” by Eze Paez
  • “Voluntary Informed Consent in Paediatric Oncology Research” by Sara A. S. Dekking, Rieke Van Der Graaf and Johannes J. M. Van Delden
  • “Quantifying Health Across Populations” by Stephen Kershnar

 

For Surgeons, Talking About Adverse Events Can Be Difficult: Study

July 20, 2016

(Kaiser Health News) – Medical mistakes often happen. National guidelines call for doctors to provide full disclosure about adverse events, and studies have shown that those discussions benefit patients. But new research finds that the act of disclosure, combined with stress from the procedure gone wrong, can be an anxious experience for some doctors — and more training is needed to help them engage in these difficult conversations. The study, published in JAMA Surgery Wednesday, examines what surgeons tell patients and what effect those discussion can have on the doctor.

The Unsung Heroes of CRISPR

July 20, 2016

(Nature) – Wiedenheft, however, has hardly achieved the same fame as his mentor — and nor have the other students and postdocs who toiled at the bench to make CRISPR genome editing a reality. They certainly reap benefits from their work: support and reflected glory from their supervisors, as well as expertise in a coveted technique. But some also face a difficult transition to becoming independent scientists as they try to establish themselves in a hypercompetitive field.

Human Brain Mapped in Unprecedented Detail

July 20, 2016

(Nature) – Neuroscientists have long sought to divide the brain into smaller pieces to better appreciate how it works as a whole. One of the best-known brain maps chops the cerebral cortex into 52 areas based on the arrangement of cells in the tissue. More recently, maps have been constructed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques — such as functional MRI, which measures the flow of blood in response to different mental tasks. Yet until now, most such maps have been based on a single type of measurement. That can provide an incomplete or even misleading view of the brain’s inner workings, says Thomas Yeo, a computational neuroscientist at the National University of Singapore. The new map is based on multiple MRI measurements, which Yeo says “greatly increases confidence that they are producing the best in vivo estimates of cortical areas”.

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