Bioethics.com

Subscribe to Bioethics.com feed
Your global information source on bioethics news and issues
Updated: 53 min 57 sec ago

Crowd-Sourced Genetic Data Shows Depression Is a Brain Disease

August 3, 2016

(Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News) – Customers of 23andMe, a genetic testing service, contributed their data to a large-scale study of depression, allowing the study to succeed where earlier, smaller, and more conventional studies failed. The new study uncovered 17 genetic variations linked to depression at 15 genomic locations. In doing so, the new study has not only demonstrated the value of crowdsourced data, it has also established that depression is a brain disease with its own biology.

Australia Urges Cambodia to Crack Down on Surrogacy Services

August 3, 2016

(The Sydney Morning Herald) – Cambodia has told Australia that commercial surrogacy is prohibited in the country as an increasing number of Australian couples seek surrogacy services in the capital Phnom Penh. The edict leaves several dozen Australian couples who have gone to Cambodia seeking to become the biological parents to babies born to surrogate mothers open to possible imprisonment and fines for human trafficking.

The Future of Genetic Enhancement Is Not in the West

August 3, 2016

(The Conversation) – So are we on the brink of a brave new world of genetically enhanced humanity? Perhaps. And there’s an interesting wrinkle: It’s reasonable to believe that any seismic shift toward genetic enhancement will not be centered in Western countries like the U.S. or the U.K., where many modern technologies are pioneered. Instead, genetic enhancement is more likely to emerge out of China.

A New Edition of Hastings Center Report Is Now Available

August 3, 2016

Hastings Center Report (vol. 46, no. 4, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “The Ethics of Infection Challenges in Primates” by Anne Barnhill, Steven Joffe and Franklin G. Miller
  • “The Disposable Author: How Pharmaceutical Marketing Is Embraced within Medicine’s Scholarly Literature” by Alastair Matheson
  • “What Is the Value of Three-Parent IVF?” by Tina Rulli
  • “Getting to Know Patients” by Caroline Eden
  • “Politics and Public Health: The Flint Drinking Water Crisis” by Lawrence O. Gostin

 

A New Edition of Neuroethics Is Now Available

August 3, 2016

Neuroethics (vol. 9, no. 2, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “The Bright Future of Neuroethics” by Veljko Dubljevi?, Victoria H. Saigle & Eric Racine
  • “Incarceration, Direct Brain Intervention, and the Right to Mental Integrity – a Reply to Thomas Douglas” by Jared N. Craig
  • “A Defense of Brain Death” by  Nada Gligorov
  • “Deep Brain Stimulation, Historicism, and Moral Responsibility” by Daniel Sharp & David Wasserman
  • “LIS and BCIs: a Local, Pluralist, and Pragmatist Approach to 4E Cognition” by Ruth Hibbert

 

A New Edition of The New England Journal of Medicine Is Now Available

August 3, 2016

The New England Journal of Medicine (vol. 375, no. 3, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Obamacare’s Skyrocketing Premiums? Why the Sky Isn’t Falling” by B.D. Sommers
  • “Beyond the Ebola Battle — Winning the War against Future Epidemics” by V.J. Dzau and P. Sands
  • “History of Medicine: Donabedian’s Lasting Framework for Health Care Quality” by J.Z. Ayanian and H. Markel

 

A New Edition of IRB: Ethics and Human Research Is Now Available

August 3, 2016

IRB: Ethics and Human Research (vol. 38, no. 4, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Parent and Child Perceptions of the Benefits of Research Participation” by Victoria A. Miller and Chris Feudtner
  • “Employees as Research Participants: Ethical and Policy Issues” by David B. Resnik

 

A New Edition of Studies in Christian Ethics is Available

August 3, 2016

Studies in Christian Ethics (Volume 29, No. 3, 2016) is now available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Scripts for Modern Dying: The Death before Death We Have Invented, the Death before Death We Fear and Some Take Too Literally, and the Death before Death Christians Believe in” by Michael Banner
  • “Arts of Dying and the Statecraft of Killing” by Jeffrey P. Bishop
  • “The Nature of Contemporary Dying: Obsessions, Distortions, Challenges” by Allan Kellehear
  • “A New Art of Dying as a Cultural Challenge” by Carlo Leget
  • “Geographies and Accompaniment: Toward an Ecclesial Re-ordering of the Art of Dying” by M. Therese Lysaught
  • “The Strange Work of Dying” by Susan Parsons
  • “Apostles of Suicide: Theological Precedent for Christian Support of ‘Assisted Dying’” by David Albert Jones

 

 

Remote Heart Monitoring Can Help Detect Emergencies

August 2, 2016

(Reuters) – Instead of having heart monitors with noisy alarms near patients’ beds in the hospital, it might be better to have off-site technicians do the heart monitoring remotely, a recent study suggests. Traditional on-site heart monitoring can involve a lot of false alarms that don’t always help detect cardiac arrests and other serious events, said lead study author Dr. David Cantillon, a researcher at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio.

Almost 40 Per Cent of Women Suffer Forced Sex as Men Still Refuse to Use Condoms: Study

August 2, 2016

(India Today) – A report in the Indian Journal of Community Medicine’s latest issue highlights Rani’s suffering to underscore how many women face sexual and physical violence from their husbands over disagreement on safe sex. The study conducted by the departments of obstetrics and gynaecology and family planning at Delhi’s University College of Medical Sciences also shows that several victims silently tolerate the torture, believing it’s their destiny. Of the 500 women who participated, about 46 per cent said they could not use condoms because it was their husbands’ decision.

Opioid Dependence Leads to ‘Tsunami’ of Medical Services, Study Finds

August 2, 2016

(Kaiser Health News) – In one of the first looks at privately insured patients with opioid problems, researchers paint a grim picture: Medical services for people with opioid dependence diagnoses skyrocketed more than 3,000 percent between 2007 and 2014. The study considers a huge cohort of people who have either job-based insurance or buy coverage on their own. Its findings illustrate that the opioid problem is “in the general mainstream,” said Robin Gelburd, president of Fair Health, a nonprofit databank corporation focused on health care cost transparency and insurance information. “Is the health system preparing for this tsunami of services?” she said.

Brain Implants and Gene-Editing Enhancements Worry US Public

August 2, 2016

(Nature) – Most people in the United States are more worried than enthusiastic about the prospect of scientific advances such as gene editing and brain-chip implants, a survey of thousands suggests. The Pew Research Center in Washington DC asked 4,726 US people about the potential uses of three biomedical technologies that it classified as ‘potential human enhancement’: gene editing to reduce disease risk in babies; brain implants to enhance concentration and brain processes, and transfusions of synthetic blood to improve strength and stamina. (None of these procedures are a reality, but the underlying technologies are being researched.)

7 Things to Know About Pharmacogenomics

August 2, 2016

(U.S. News & World Report) – We all know a medication that works well for one person might not work for another – or even cause some people unwanted side effects. These differences in response can be caused by factors such as age, gender or other drugs and supplements that a person might be taking. However, up to 99 percent of us may have small variations in our genes that can also impact how we react to common medications, including pain relievers, antidepressants and blood thinners.

Employment Opportunity: Tenure Stream Position, University of Pittsburgh School of Law

August 2, 2016

The University of Pittsburgh School of Law invites applications for a tenure-stream position beginning in the 2017-2018 academic year. For this position, we seek candidates interested in teaching courses in the health law area. The successful candidate will become an integral part of Pitt Law’s nationally ranked health law program, which includes a Health Law Certificate Program, Health Law Clinic, joint degree programs in law and public health with Pitt’s Graduate School of Public Health and in law and bioethics with Pitt’s Center for Bioethics and Health Law, an online graduate certificate in Health Care Compliance aimed at working professionals, and the University’s interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics and Health Law. We anticipate hiring for this position at the rank of assistant, associate, or full professor, depending on the candidate’s qualifications. We encourage applications from entry-level candidates and laterals of all ranks (i.e., both junior and senior) for this position.

Preference will be given to candidates who are also interested in teaching in one or more of the following areas: administrative/regulatory law, business/corporate law, civil procedure, innovation law, intellectual property law, or patent law. We are particularly interested in faculty members who have an interest in or experience with incorporating experiential learning or innovative pedagogy (e.g., writing intensive, interprofessional, flipped classroom, etc.) into their courses.
The University of Pittsburgh is an equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, veteran status, disability, national origin, creed, marital status, age, gender identity or sexual orientation in its hiring.  In furtherance of our strong institutional commitment to a diverse faculty, we particularly welcome applications from minorities, women, and others who would add diversity to our faculty.  Recruitment is subject to approval by the University’s Provost.

Contact: Anthony C. Infanti, Chair, Faculty Appointments Committee, University of Pittsburgh School of Law, 3900 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15260.  Email: law-appointments@pitt.edu. Email submissions are preferred.  The deadline for applications is October 15, 2016.

Employment Opportunity: Law School Faculty, University of Nevada, Las Vegas-William S. Boyd School of Law

August 2, 2016

University of Nevada, Las Vegas-William S. Boyd School of Law invites applications from entry-levels and laterals. The Boyd School of Law is a leading public law school with a reputation for a strong commitment to scholarship and teaching. The law school’s state-of-the-art facilities are located in the center of the UNLV campus.  UNLV is the state’s largest comprehensive doctoral degree granting institution, including a new medical school.  Applicants for law school faculty positions should submit a letter of interest along with a detailed resume, at least three professional references, and cites or links to published works. We anticipate hiring as many as three new faculty colleagues, although of course the number of available positions is contingent on funding. We invite applications from scholars in all subject areas, and are especially interested in deepening our strengths in the areas of Criminal Law, Business/Commercial Law, Health Law, and Legal Writing. We are also especially interested in hearing from professors who are interested in teaching a clinic. With respect to our clinics and legal writing program, please note that UNLV has a unified tenure track; accordingly, professors who teach clinics or legal writing have all of the privileges and scholarly expectations that are associated with tenure. Applications are considered on a rolling basis, and appointments would likely begin with the 2017-2018 academic year.
Contact:  Please send application materials to the Appointments Committee Coordinator, Ms. Annette Mann, Faculty Appointments Committee, UNLV—Boyd School of Law, 4505 South Maryland Parkway – Campus Box 451003, Las Vegas, NV  89154-1003 or by email to annette.mann@unlv.edu. Members of the Appointments Committee are Thomas Main (chair), Michael Kagan, Terry Pollman, Jeff Stempel, Jean Sternlight, and Stacey Tovino.

UNLV is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity educator and employer committed to excellence through diversity.

Sex Change Men ‘on Brink’ of Having Babies Following NHS Treatment

August 1, 2016

(The Telegraph) – Women having sex changes on the NHS are being given free fertility treatment so they can have children after becoming men. At least three British men who were born female are “on the brink” of becoming parents using fertility techniques, a leading expert has said. In most cases, eggs are being frozen at NHS clinics before surgery or hormone therapy, so they can later be implanted into a surrogate mother.

Supreme Court May Be Converting on Religion

August 1, 2016

(USA Today) – The Supreme Court’s defense of religious freedom may be on the decline. Still reeling from the death of its most devout justice, Antonin Scalia, the high court has put preventing discrimination above protecting religion in a series of cases over the past year, from same-sex marriage to abortion and contraception.

The Best Drug to Fight Zika May Already Be Approved and Out There, Study Suggests

August 1, 2016

(STAT News) – Several teams of scientists are racing to develop a vaccine for the Zika virus. But what if a drug that already exists could stop an infection in its tracks? According to new research, it’s not a totally crazy idea. A group of researchers has identified two dozen Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs that have shown some ability to block Zika from infecting human cells in the lab, according to a paper published Thursday in the journal Cell Host & Microbe. Some of these drugs — which treat infections, cancers, and even depression— also showed potential to prevent infection in certain cells tied to fetal defects in pregnant women.

Portable Device Produces Biopharmaceuticals on Demand

August 1, 2016

(Managed Care Magazine) – Biopharmaceutical drugs, which are used in a wide range of therapies including vaccines and treatments for diabetes and cancer, are typically produced in large, centralized fermentation plants. This means they must be transported to the treatment site, which can be expensive, time-consuming, and challenging to execute in areas with poor supply chains. Now a portable production system, designed to manufacture a range of biopharmaceuticals on demand, has been developed by researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), with funding from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

Women Being Wrongly Pushed into IVF Treatment by Private Clinics, Says UK’s Leading Fertility Expert

August 1, 2016

(The Telegraph) – Britain’s leading fertility expert Robert Winston has said women remain fertile until they are 45 and are wrongly being pushed into having IVF too early by private clinics. Lord Winston, who is head of the Genesis Research Trust, dismissed NHS advice that a woman’s fertility starts to decline sharply from 35 and that those planning a family should take this into account. Lord Winston said women should be able to conceive until their mid-40s, and suggested fertility clinics that said otherwise were doing so for financial gain.

Pages