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Former NIH Stem-Cell Chief Joins New York Foundation

April 14, 2014

(Nature) – Stem-cell biologist Mahendra Rao, who resigned last week as director of the Center for Regenerative Medicine (CRM) at the US National Institutes of Health (NIH), has a new job. On 9 April, he was appointed vice-president for regenerative medicine at the New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF), a non-profit organization that funds embryonic stem-cell research.

Harvard Investigation Leads to ‘Expression of Concern’ on Brigham-Led Stem Cell Research

April 14, 2014

(Boston.com) – Two days after a heart research paper was retracted, questions have been raised about a stem cell study overseen by the same prominent Brigham and Women’s Hospital cardiovascular researcher. In an “expression of concern” posted online Thursday night, editors of the British medical journal The Lancet said Harvard Medical School had notified them of an ongoing investigation examining the “integrity of certain data” used in two sets of images of cells in a 2011 paper overseen by Dr. Piero Anversa at the Brigham.

Dubai Rolling Out Red Carpet for Medical Tourism Patients

April 14, 2014

(Medical Tourism Magazine) – The Dubai Health Authority has its eyes set on attracting 500,000 medical tourism patients a year and plans to build 22 hospitals, boosting the national economy by up to Dh2.6 billion by 2020. Designs aimed at making Dubai a major center for medical tourism in time for when the United Arab Emirates land territory hosts World Expo 2020 include the hiring of thousands of healthcare staff and new visas.

ASU Leads New National Research Network to Study Impacts of Nanomaterials

April 14, 2014

(Phys.org) – Arizona State University researchers will lead a multi-university project to aid industry in understanding and predicting the potential health and environmental risks from nanomaterials.  Nanoparticles, which are approximately 1 to 100 nanometers in size, are used in an increasing number of consumer products to provide texture, resiliency and in some cases antibacterial protection.

Event: MedStar Washington Hospital Center Third Annual Regional Clinical Ethics Symposium

April 14, 2014

MedStar Washington Hospital Center for Ethics
3rd Annual Regional Clinical Ethics Symposium
April 21, 2014
Washington, D.C.

See here for more information.

A New Edition of Health Policy and Planning is Available

April 11, 2014

Health Policy and Planning (Volume 29, No. 2, March 2014) is now available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Impact of user fees on maternal health service utilization and related health outcomes: a systematic review” by Susie Dzakpasu, Timothy Powell-Jackson, and Oona M.R. Campbell
  • “Estimates of performance in the rate of decline of under-five mortality for 113 low- and middle-income countries, 1970–2010” by Stéphane Verguet and Dean T. Jamison
  • “Financial protection in health in Turkey: the effects of the Health Transformation Programme” by Mahmut S Yardim, Nesrin Cilingiroglu, and Nazan Yardim
  • “Health reform and out-of-pocket payments: lessons from China” by Lufa Zhang and Nan Liu
  • “Through the back door: nurse migration to the UK from Malawi and Nepal, a policy critique” by Radha Adhikari and Astrida Grigulis

A New Edition of Christian Bioethics is Available

April 11, 2014

Christian Bioethics (Volume 20, No. 1, April 2014) is now available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Reformed Christian Bioethics: Developing a Field of Scholarship” by Ryan R. Nash
  • “Reframing the Relevance of Calvinism and the Reformed Tradition for 21st Century Bioethics” by Jon C. Tilburt and Katherine M. Humeniuk
  • “Can Calvin Save Medicine? A Response to Jeff Bishop” by Allen Verhey
  • “Health and Medicine in the Perspective of the Westminster Confession of Faith” by Franklin E. Payne
  • “Calvin and the Duty to Respect a Patient’s Trust” by David T. Ball

A New Edition of Developing World Bioethics is Available

April 11, 2014

Developing World Bioethics (Volume 14, No. 1, April 2014) is now available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Bioethics and Forensic Psychiatry” by Debora Diniz
  • “Impact of Three Years Training on Operations Capacities of Research Ethics Committees in Nigeria” by Morenike Oluwatoyin Folayan, et al.
  • “On Abortion: Exploring Psychological Meaning and Attitudes in a Sample of Mexican Gynecologists” by Ma. Luisa Marván, Asunción Álvarez del Río and Zaira Campos
  • “Ethical Issues in Field Trials of Genetically Modified Disease-Resistant Mosquitoes” by David B. Resnik
  • “The Ethics of Engaged Presence: A Framework for Health Professionals in Humanitarian Assistance and Development Work” by Matthew R. Hunt, et al.

A New Edition of Journal of Medical Ethics is Available

April 11, 2014

Journal of Medical Ethics (Volume 40, No. 4, April 2014) is now available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Freedom and moral enhancement” by Michael J Selgelid
  • “The duty to be Well-informed: The case of depression” by Charlotte Blease
  • “Approaches to suffering at the end of life: the use of sedation in the USA and Netherlands” by Judith AC Rietjens, et al.
  • “Moral concerns with sedation at the end of life” by Charles Douglas
  • “Genetic modifications for personal enhancement: a defence” by Timothy F Murphy
  • “Voluntary moral enhancement and the survival-at-any-cost bias” by  Vojin Rakić
  • “Embryonic viability, parental care and the pro-life thesis: a defence of Bovens” by Jonathan Surovell
  • “Differentiating between human and non-human interspecies embryos” by Calum MacKellar

A New Edition of Health Education Research is Available

April 11, 2014

Health Education Research (Volume 29, No. 2, April 2014) is now available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Barriers and facilitators in health education for adults with intellectual disabilities—a qualitative study” by H. Bergström, L. S. Elinder, and U. Wihlman
  • “Using the Precaution Adoption Process model to describe a disaster preparedness intervention among low-income Latinos” by Deborah C. Glik, et al.
  • “A televised entertainment-education drama to promote positive discussion about organ donation” by Georges E. Khalil and Lance S. Rintamaki
  • “School-based HIV/AIDS education is associated with reduced risky sexual behaviors and better grades with gender and race/ethnicity differences” by Zhen-qiang Ma, Monica A. Fisher, and Lewis H. Kuller
  • “Including a client sexual health pathway in a national youth mental health early intervention service—project rationale and implementation strategy” by C. A. Edwards, et al.

Medical First as Noses Are ‘Regrown’

April 11, 2014

(The Telegraph) – Surgeons have rebuilt the noses of five skin cancer patients by growing the nasal tissue. They successfully rebuilt their nostrils with a revolutionary technique in which cells were taken from their nasal septum, the cartilage partition which runs down the middle of the nose. A year afterwards, all recipients were satisfied with their ability to breathe as well as the cosmetic appearance, and did not report any side effects.

Budget Chief Is Obama’s Choice as New Health Secretary

April 11, 2014

(The New York Times) – On Friday, President Obama is to nominate Ms. Burwell, currently director of the White House Office of Management and Budget, to take over one of the largest and most unwieldy parts of the federal bureaucracy as secretary of health and human services. If confirmed, Ms. Burwell would replace Kathleen Sebelius, who is resigning.

Scientists Grow Viable Vaginas from Girls’ Own Cells

April 11, 2014

(Reuters) – Four young women born with abnormal or missing vaginas were implanted with lab-grown versions made from their own cells, the latest success in creating replacement organs that have so far included tracheas, bladders and urethras. Follow-up tests show the new vaginas are indistinguishable from the women’s own tissue and have grown in size as the young women, who got the implants as teens, matured.

Cost of Drugs Used by Medicare Doctors Can Vary Greatly by Region, Analysis Finds

April 11, 2014

(Washington Post) – An analysis of government data released Wednesday shows that the cost of drugs administered by doctors accounts for a growing piece of Medicare’s spending and varies widely from region to region in the United States, raising questions about whether some physicians may be misusing the pharmaceuticals. Most of the 4,000 doctors who received at least $1 million from Medicare in 2012 billed mainly for giving patients injections, infusions and other drug treatments, those records show.

European Union Debates Initiative on Embryo Protection

April 11, 2014

(New York Times) – A packed hearing on a petition calling for the protection of human embryos led to a rare outbreak of raucous exchanges in the European Parliament on Thursday — a sign that the battles over abortion and stem cell research that divide nations like Spain and the United States are making a serious incursion into European Union affairs.

Researchers Identify Transcription Factors Distinguishing Glioblastoma Stem Cells

April 11, 2014

(Medical Xpress) – The activity of four transcription factors – proteins that regulate the expression of other genes – appears to distinguish the small proportion of glioblastoma cells responsible for the aggressiveness and treatment resistance of the deadly brain tumor. The findings by a team of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators, which will be published in the April 24 issue of Cell and are receiving advance online release, support the importance of epigenetics – processes controlling whether or not genes are expressed – in cancer pathology and identify molecular circuits that may be targeted by new therapeutic approaches.

Luring Medical Tourists for Cash Is a Trip Down the Slippery Slope

April 11, 2014

(The Globe and Mail) – So it looks like the ‘magic bullet’ solution has been found at last to cure Canada’s health care woes: medical tourism. Last week, Toronto’s Sunnybrook hospital defended its position to court affluent medical patients from other countries who can afford to pay generously for out-of-pocket care in a Canadian hospital. It’s a revenue-generating solution for a cash-strapped system, we are told. A handful of other hospitals already engage in this practice, and many across the country are starting to sit up and take notice. Should we break out the champagne and celebrate?

Deconstructing Dignity: A Critique of the Right-to-Die Debate, by Scott Cutler Shershow

April 11, 2014

(The Times Higher Education) – This is a highly topical book, in view of the intense debates taking place in many countries about the possible legalisation of assisted suici